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Hot Tub Pump Motor Replacement

July 13th, 2015 by

spa-motor-and-wet-endReplacing a spa or hot tub motor saves about 40% over the cost of replacing the entire pump, and there’s no plumbing required!

Hot tub motors are as easy to replace as the entire pump, and can be done in under an hour. Another benefit to re-using the existing wet end is that you can reduce waste around the home. Why throw out something that’s perfectly good?

The Wet End to which I refer, if you don’t know, is the plastic front half of your hot tub pump, the end that gets wet. The “Dry End” then, although we don’t call it that, is the metal cased electric motor, the back half of your spa pump.

Replacing the motor involves separating the motor from the wet end and removing the wires or plug, and then reversing the process to connect a new spa motor! Let’s get started!

1. Disconnect the Pump: Unplug the spa pump cord from the outlet, or disconnect the amp or pin connector on the spa pack. Next close the valves on both sides of the pump. If you don’t have valves, you will need to drain the spa before pulling the pump. Afterwards, loosen the spa pump unions, turning counter-clockwise by hand. If more force is required, use large Channel Lock type pliers or a Strap Wrench to disconnect both unions on the pump. If your pump happens to be bolted down to the base or floor, I’m sorry – bust out your socket set or wrench set to remove the nuts, otherwise lift the pump carefully out of it’s location to a well-lit work bench or counter.

2. Remove the Through Bolts: On the back of the motor are 4 carriage bolts, at 10, 2, 4 and 8 o’clock. Spray a little WD-40 on both ends of the bolt, on the head, and where the bolt screws into the plastic wet end, on the other end of the motor. Loosen these with a small nut driver , or straight pliers, and slide the long bolts out. In some cases where the bolts are severely corroded, they may snap on the threaded end. If so, proceed to the next step, and once the wet end is separated, soak the bolts ends again with penetrating oil and try to twist the broken bolt end out of the plastic wet end.

3. Remove the Impeller: This is the part that baffles and confuses many DIY spa owners, but it’s not really so hard to accomplish. The trick is to hold the motor impeller stationary while unthreading it from the end of the shaft.

separate-pump-from-;wet-endUsing two large screwdrivers, insert a large Phillips head screwdriver down into the top water port of the pump (where the water comes out). and into one of the vanes of the impeller. Use a flashlight if necessary, to insert the screwdriver about an inch into the side slots of the impeller to lock it into place. Now open up the back cap of the motor and turn the shaft counter-clockwise with a large slotted screwdriver, or alternatively, grab the shaft with pliers just behind the impeller, and turn the shaft counter-clockwise, to spin the shaft off of the impeller, in 4-5 turns.

4. Replace the Motor: Step 4 is just the reverse of step three. Once you separate the wet end from the motor, you can slide the old motor out of the way, and slide the new motor in place.  Push the wet end gently onto the new motor shaft, and tighten the shaft at the back of the new motor with a large flathead screwdriver. Turn the shaft until you feel it tighten onto the impeller fully. When it starts up it will spin itself tighter. In most cases a new shaft seal is not needed, but if your old seal was leaking, take a look at another post I wrote on how to replace a spa pump shaft seal.

5. Replace the Spa Motor Cord: The motor power cord from your old motor can be removed and reused on your new motor, barring any defects or wear and tear that would suggest replacement.

wiring-a-spa-pump-motorTwo speed motors have 4-wires, and single speed motors have 3-wires. Typical wire harness colors have black and red as Hots, White as Common and the green wire is for Ground. In most cases, you will hook up the wires exactly the same onto the new motor. Labeling the wires, or making a small sketch before removal can be helpful to remember the wire connections. Use a pair of needle nose pliers to remove spade connectors, or a small flat head screwdriver can be used as a lever to push connectors off of the terminals.

~ And that’s all there is to it! If you are looking at a failed spa pump, or one that is giving you trouble and may give up the ghost soon, consider replacing only the motor – rarely do any other parts need to be replaced.

new-spa-pump-motorsSave 40% over buying the entire pump, and replace just the motor! Prices for Hot Tub Pump Motors start at $129.

For help selecting the correct spa pump motor, put on your glasses and grab a flashlight – crawl up under there and write down HP, FR, SF, and Voltage information, and any brand names printed on the pump. Then give us a call or shoot us an email, and we’ll give you the options for your spa pump motor replacement.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

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