Free Shipping on all Spa Covers and orders over $100 Weekly Specials - Up to 20% Off Spa Parts!
1-800-770-0292
M-F - 7am-7pm CST
Sat. - 7am-4pm CST
Sun. - Closed

Archive for the ‘Spa Parts’ Category

Replace or Renovate an Old Hot Tub?

August 4th, 2014 by

old-ugly-spaMost spa owners grapple with this question, if they live in one place long enough.

It usually happens like this – one day a spa repairman hands you an estimate for repair, in excess of $1000, and in addition to that, it’s time for another spa cover, and the cabinet is looking, well – less attractive than it once looked.

The manufacturers life expectancy of a spa, even good spas, is only 10-15 years.

However, you could keep renovating the spa every 10 years, and keep the same spa shell forever. A new spa pack every 10 years, maybe a new topside control. Excluding any catastrophic damage from extreme neglect, you could operate this way for 30 years, easy.

However, you just happened to catch a glimpse of the glitzy new spa models, with so many jets and features, and you think it may be time for a brand new spa. I know many people that do it like this; every 10 years, they just go out and buy a new spa.

 

What’s your Type?

It all comes down to what type of person you are. Take my little quiz below:

[] Yes  [] No – Do you prefer to replace or repair other home appliances, when they need repair?

[] Yes  [] No – Do you buy a new car every 3-5 years?

[] Yes  [] No – Do you enjoy DIY repair projects around the home?

[] Yes  [] No – Do you own 3 or more flat screen Televisions?

If you answered Yes to 3 or more of these questions, you are what experts call a “replacer”. If you answered No to 3 or more questions, you are what we call a “repairer“.

 

What’s your Threshold?

New Spas range in price from about $3000 to $9000, with the average price falling just north of $5 grand. For many people, they would consider a new spa when repair costs exceed half of the cost of a new spa. Like an insurance actuary, you analyze the risk and benefit of repairing, renovating and refurbishing your existing spa, versus ‘totaling’ the spa, and plunking down some cash on a new one.

sick-carThe comparisons to automobiles are intentional, and here’s another one; keep in mind that your old spa has very little trade-in value. You may sell it to a close friend or family member, but really, no one else wants to buy somebody’s used spa. Some spa dealers will take it off your hands, if they are in the business of refurbishing, or if you buy a new spa from them – but  don’t expect them to write you a check for it.

It’s mostly a financial decision, or it should be, but often some emotion creeps into the equation. You may start to weigh the benefits of a new spa such as high tech features, warranty, appearance, size or seating configuration. Go ahead, add in these benefits, crunch the numbers again and see where you stand.

 

Spa Renovation Ideas:AquaRock Morocco 90 Spa

  • Refinish the wood Cabinet exterior
  • Construct a Pergola or Privacy Screen
  • Replace the Spa Pack and Control Panel
  • Clean and Polish the Spa Surfaces
  • Replace the Spa Cover
  • Replace the Spa Filter

You can do all of these things above for less than $2000, so if it were me, I’d Renovate my spa, until the cows come home. But then, I guess I’m just a repairer at heart. But I also have a threshold – I’m in year 11 now with my current spa – I think I can make it to 20 years…!

 

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

 

The Dead Spa: No Power Hot Tub

July 31st, 2014 by

spa-has-no-power

It’s happened to me plenty of times – get myself all ready for a nice soak in the tub, lift the lid and find lukewarm water and no lights on the control panel.

It’s usually an easy fix, when you have no power to the spa – the greater disappointment is not being able to use the spa at that moment.

If you’ve ever found a ‘Dead Spa’, with no power at all, no indicator lights, nothing at all – this post is for you. Use these steps to troubleshoot a hot tub with no power.

 

 

Tripped Breaker

Check the main circuit breaker that provides power to the spa. This may be located in the home main panel, or inside a smaller panel near the hot tub. To reset a circuit breaker, first push it towards OFF, and then flip it back to ON. If the breaker begins to repeatedly trip (known as nuisance tripping), it may need to be replaced, or there could be voltage irregularity. Consult your electrician for testing or replacement.

Tripped GFCI

This one gets me all the time. My spa, and most others, have an electrical outlet attached to the spa pak. This is one of those GFI outlets with the red test button, and a black reset button. If you find it tripped, just push the red button back in. If the outlet continues to pop, either immediately or later, there is some stray voltage grounding out, and causing the button to pop. Consult an electrician to find the source, if not readily apparent (burnt wires, insects or rodent damage, water).

Blown Fuse

Spas and some hot tubs have internal fuses, which are meant to blow when voltage spikes occur, to protect your equipment (pumps, blower, heater). A blown fuse could just be a blown fuse, or it could point to a blower or pump that is shorting out, or it could mean the transformer is allowing too much voltage to pass through. Check your owner’s manual for location of any fuses, and always replace with the exact duplicate fuse.

Faulty Wiring

Incoming wires can be damaged from heat or rodents, or you may have loose connections, or wires touching each other. This will often cause a breaker to trip or fuse to blow, but not always. If it’s the wires carrying power into the transformer, or out of the transformer, you can have a ‘no power’ situation. Shut off all power before touching or replacing any damaged spa wiring.

Tripped High-limit switch

In some spas, a heater high limit switch can cause a complete power shut down, to protect equipment (and you!) from harm. If your spa pak has a hi limit reset button, (usually red), give this a push to see if power is restored. Thermal overloads (motors, blowers), can also prevent equipment from coming on, but don’t usually shut down all power and lights to the spa.

Bad Transformer

A transformer reduces voltage, ‘transforming’ it to a specific lower voltage. A spa may have 220V coming into the transformer and 40 volts coming out, for example – but this varies from spa to spa. A voltmeter can be used to test the transformer output, to see that it’s within 10% of the rated output voltage, which is normally printed right on the transformer.

Bad Panel

Finally, if you have no indicator lights on your control panel, look underneath for lights on the spa pak. For a control panel that is unresponsive, with no LED’s or temp reading, check the wire harness from the spa pak to the circuit board for a loose connection or damaged wire. It could also be a bad circuit board (but I hope not!).

~ Soooo, if your spa has no power, no lights, no nuthin’ – check out these 7 possibilities.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’!

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

Leaking Spa Jets – How to Find & Fix

July 28th, 2014 by

spa-leak-JD-FinleySpas and hot tubs are not supposed to leak, but over time, it’s not uncommon for a leak to develop in an older spa. Knowing where to look for spa leaks is the first step in leak detection.

Spas and hot tubs can leak in many locations, including from the spa jets themselves. Rarely do spas leak from the shell itself = they are simply too strong, rather leaks are almost always found in plumbing junctions, gaskets or seals.

A spa can evaporate several inches of water if left open and uncovered, or used for several hours per week. But, if you are adding more replacement water than normal, and perhaps using the spa less lately…you may have a leak.

If you think you are losing water in your spa – open the equipment access and check these areas first:

  1. Water dripping off of the pump (unions, drain plugs, shaft seal)
  2. Water dripping off of heater (unions, pressure switch)
  3. Water pouring out of blower (check valve failure)
  4. Water leaking from valves (valve body or gasket failure)
  5. Water leaking from spa light (gasket failure)
  6. Water leaking from jets (internal cracks or bad gasket)

 

spa-jets-leaking=Still Leaking? If you got through 1-5 and found no puddles or dripping water, it’s time to look at the spa jets, which leak rarely, maybe 10% of the time. Spa jets can leak where the flex pipe attaches (shown Green), either the larger water pipes, or the smaller air line.

They can also lose the seal made by a rubber gasket (shown Red) against the back of the spa shell. These rubber gaskets, compressed by the locking nut or the jet body, can deteriorate over time – or it could just be a loose locking nut.

 

spa-jet-tools-spa-jet-wrenchesSpa Jet Tools. Many spa jets have a special wrench used to tighten their particular jet lock nut. Others have a tool that is inserted on the spa side, to keep the flange from spinning while the lock nut or valve body is tightened up on the gasket. Without the proper spa jet tools, some of them are nearly impossible to seal up.

 

FULL FOAM INSULATION:

For spas that have full spray insulation on the underside of the spa shell, finding the source of a spa leak can be challenging – but not impossible. If you have spa jets at different levels, around the spa (as most do), you can shut off the pump, and let the spa leak until it stabilizes at one particular level – or stops leaking. At the point that it stops, which may be at the bottom of one of your spa jets, is the point to start looking.

leaking-spa-jets--sideIf you see water coming out from under your spa on one side of the spa, that can be the logical place for exploration. Removing the cabinet on that side would be required; a razor knife and putty knife are useful tools to score and pry off a panel, if there are no visible screws. Proceed slowly to avoid damaging any side panels while removing them for access.

Once access is made behind the panel, the insulation can be cut with a drywall saw or serrated kitchen knife, at the level of suspected spa jets. Open many small holes if you have many jets to check on that side. Proceed cautiously as you near the jets, to avoid cutting pipes or wires.

After a repair to jets or pipes buried in insulation foam, replace any large blocks of foam you managed to remove intact, and then fill in any gaps with a spray foam insulation. I like to use Touch ‘n Foam 2-part, which you can get at most Home Depot type stores. Or you can stuff it full of fiberglass insulation, the pink stuff.

A QUICKER METHOD TO REPAIR LEAKING SPA JETS

You may have already wondered, “can’t I just put a sealant on the inside of the spa, around the jet fitting?” If the leak is the gasket and not the pipe connections, which it usually is.

spa-jet-problemsfood-coloringTo verify, you can dye test around the spa jets with food coloring. Shut off the pump, and with bright lighting and a mask or goggles, squirt small drops of dye underwater, around the jet face or flange. Sometimes the leak is too small to pull enough dye through, and sometimes the jet gasket only leaks when the pumps are on.

You may want to try to seal up around a suspected spa jet, using BOSS® silicone, or similar products, but – it may not fix the problem and can be messy looking unless you are careful and skillful during application.

 

- Jack

 

Installing a New Spa Pump

April 3rd, 2014 by

spa-pump-installation

 

I have heard that the industry average for spa pump motor is about 8 years. When the motor goes, you have a choice – replace just the motor, or buy the entire pump.

The same with the wet end, or the opposite end of the pump, you could just replace a new wet end onto the existing motor. We have a large inventory of parts for spa pumps, to fix almost any pump problem.

But…if you’d rather not get your hands dirty, and prefer to just replace the entire pump – motor and wet end, then this post is for you. Here’s how to replace a typical spa pump, wired into a spa pack.

 

1. Check the Frame, Horsepower, Voltage & Speed

You don’t want to install the wrong pump, so get out your reading glasses and a flashlight, and inspect the label on the pump motor. Look for FR which indicates frame type (48 or 56), HP for horsepower(1 – 5), Voltage (115 or 230) and Speed (single or dual). Replace your existing pump with the same size and type spa pump. adjustable spa-pump-volute

Also pay attention to how the pump discharge is oriented, is it on the side, or on the top center? These are two different wet ends. The side discharge spa pump can be rotated to different locations by loosening the volute screws, but the center discharge is top dead center – 12:00.

If you have questions on selecting the correct spa pump, please call or email us!

2. Shut off the Power

Don’t take chances, find the correct circuit breaker that feeds the spa and shut it off. Use a piece of tape over the breaker so that no one accidentally turns it back on. After shutting off the breaker, test to be sure that power is off, then you can proceed to disassemble and remove the existing pump.

3. Disconnect Old Spa Pump

Start with removing the bare copper bonding wire that is attached to the pump. Now, assuming that the spa is drained, or you have valves closed to prevent the water from running out, slowly loosen the union nuts on the incoming and outgoing water connections of the spa pump. 1-10 gallons of water will drain out, so be prepared if your spa is located indoors.

If your spa pump is bolted to the floor, use a wrench or socket to remove the bolts on the motor footpad.

Once you can move the pump, position it to give you easy access to the wires coming into the rear of the motor. Open up the cover plate and you will find 3-wires for a single speed pump, and 4-wires for a two-speed spa pump. With a screwdriver, nut driver or needle nose, you can remove the wires from their terminal screws, and after loosening the cord clamp on the motor, gently pull the wire cable out from the existing motor.

spa-pump-replacement

For a two-speed motor, note or label the high speed and low speed wires, to wire correctly to the new motor. Get out your glasses and flashlight again, you’ll find the terminal screws are labeled in very tiny print.

4. Connect New Spa Pump

You’ll find it easier to wire the motor before you slide the pump underneath the spa. Make identical connections to the new pump. For two-speed motors, low speed is usually Red, common is White and high speed is Black, and green is of course green. However, if the wires are not an actual spa pump cord, the colors may be different. Match up the wire color to the markings on the terminal board.

Remove the pump cord clamp from the old motor and screw it into the wire access port of the new motor. Insert the pump cord through the clamp, and connect the wires to the terminals. You can either wrap the bare wire around the post, underneath the screw or nut, or use spade connectors crimped onto the end of the wire. Make sure that your connections are tight, and no wires are touching each other.pump-cord-clamp

Tighten up the pump cord clamp where the wires enter the rear of the motor, and replace the motor end cap or cover.

Next, you can thread on the union nuts to the new spa pump, making sure that the o-ring is still intact, and has not fallen out. Hand tighten the union nuts firmly. The final step is to re-secure the bolts that hold the motor foot pad to the floor or base. This helps cut down on vibration noise. Using a rubber pad beneath the pump can help reduce it even further.

Finally, reconnect the bare copper bonding wire to the bonding lug on your new spa pump.

5. Testing a New Spa Pump

spa-pakOnce the plumbing on the pump is tightened up, you can begin to fill the spa. Once you have the spa about half full, open the valves and loosen the incoming spa union to allow any air lock to escape, and tighten up firmly when water begins to drip. Continue to fill the spa full, while looking for any leaks around the new spa pump.

When the spa is full, turn on the breaker to test your spa pump, running through it’s paces. Make sure that your heater kicks on and that everything looks and sounds proper.

A fairly simple procedure, but if you need any assistance in replacing spa and hot tub pumps, we have spa techs standing by waiting for your call or email !

 

- Jack

 

Spa Pillows and Hot Tub Cushions – Get Comfy!

March 20th, 2014 by

Here’s a quick post about some of my favorite spa and hot tub accessories – Spa Pillows and Spa Cushions.

Surfaces are hard and slick in a hot tub, and even though contoured seating offers some relief, by the end of a 20 minutes spa session, you could find yourself with a sore bum or stiff neck.

spa-booster-seatsSpa Booster Seat – this ingenious product stays put, because you fill it with water, to the level of firmness that you want.

Great for kids, or short people like me, to keep your head above water, but it also makes it so much more comfortable to sit in your spa.

A hot tub cushion or spa seat also has another benefit, one that all of you ladies will understand, if you happen to enjoy time alone in the spa with your husband. WATER-SEAT

We also carry the Water Seat, which has three internal compartments to fill with marbles or washed pea gravel for a spa seat that will really mold to your shape and hold you firmly in place.

 

spa-pillows-groupSpa Pillows – this is a large category, with nearly 30 different spa pillows – some generic or universal, and some made for specific spa models from Hot Spring, Jacuzzi and Sundance.

Hot tub pillows are fairly durable items, but over time, chemicals and sun can begin to break down the outer coating, and then it starts to crack. Ugly. I just replaced my pillows last year, on a 10 year old spa – so not a bad lifespan!

Some spa pillows just disappear – maybe the wind took it, or your dog buried it somewhere in the backyard! Whatever happened, if your pillows are damaged or missing, you can find most replacements on our spa pillows page. universal-spa-pillow hot tub cushion

If you don’t see the hot tub pillow for your brand, we also have 3 generic type spa pillows on top of the page, or a universal spa pillow, the type shown here with a weighted bag that folds over the edge of the spa or hot tub.

 

Get comfy in your spa! Spa cushions and spa pillows make great spa accessories, whether you sit high in the water, or sink down very low to your chin level, cushion your spa and get more comfortable!

 

XOXO;

Gina Galvin
Hot Tub Works

 

Spa & Hot Tub Owner’s Manuals

March 17th, 2014 by

spa-owners-manualsYour spa owner’s manual is an important piece of literature, detailing safety information, installation instructions, and covering every aspect of use, care and maintenance for your spa or hot tub.

Spa manufacturers write some of the most detailed owner’s manuals that I’ve ever read. I’ve been curating spa and hot tub owner’s manuals for many years, but now they sit dusty on the shelf, as most manufacturers have their owner’s manuals listed online.

 

Here’s an extensive reference sheet on where to find owner’s manuals for a spa. Use these as guides for use, care and troubleshooting information. They also usually contain the spa warranty policy, in the appendix of the owner’s manual.

Amish Spas

Arctic Spas

Artesian Spas

Baja Spas

Barefoot Spas

Beachcomber Hot Tubs

Bullfrog Spas

Cal Spas

Caldera Spas

Catalina Spas

Centurion Hot Tubs

Clearwater Spas

Charisma Spa Operation & Installation Guide

Coast Spas

Coyote Spas

Coleman Spas

Costco Spas

Diamante Spas

Dimension One Owner’s Manuals

Dolphin Spas Use & Care Manual

Dreammaker Spas Owners Manuals

Down East Spas  Owner’s Manual

Dynasty Spas Operators Manuals

Emerald Spas Owners Manuals

Freeflow Spas Owner’s Manuals

Garden Leisure Owner’s Manual

Grecian Spas Installation Manual

Great Lakes Spas Owner’s Manuals

Gulf Coast Spas Owner’s Manuals

H2O Spas Owners Manual

Hot Spot Spas Owner’s Manuals

Hot Spring Spas Owner’s Manual

HydroPool  Hot Tubs Product Manuals

Infinity Spas Owners Manual

Jacuzzi Hot Tubs Owner’s Manuals

LA Spas Owner’s Manuals

La-Z-Boy Spas Owner’s Manual

Maax Hot Tubs Owner Manuals

Marquis Spas Owners Manual

Master Spas Owner’s Manuals

Pacific Spas Owner’s Manual

Persona Spas Owner’s Manuals

PDC Spas Owner’s and Installation Manual

Phoenix Spas Owners Manual

Pinnacle Spas Owners Manual

Polar Spas Operator Guides

Polynesian Spas Owners Manual

Saratoga Spas Owner’s Manuals

Shoreline Spas Operator’s Guide

Softub Manuals and Instructions

Solana Spa Owner’s Manual

Sonoma Spas Owner’s Manual

Spa-N-A-Box Installation Guide

Sundance Spas Owners Manuals

Sweetwater Spas Installation & Owner’s Manual

Sunbelt Spas Owners Manual

Thermo Spas Owner’s Manual

Tiger River Spas Owner’s Manual

Viking Spas

Waters Edge Spas Owner’s Guide Book
wow


Wow!
– that was quite a list of spa and hot tub owner’s manuals – not the most attractive layout, but easy to find the spa owner’s manual that you need. If you need help finding an owner’s manual for your spa that is not listed here – it may not be available. Feel free to send us an email anyway – there is a small chance that we can find it, maybe sitting dusty on a shelf in my office!

- Jack

 

 

 

Hot Tub Parts: Spa and Hot Tub Valves

February 17th, 2014 by

hot-tub-and-spa-valvesSpa & Hot Tub Valves come in two forms – water valves and check valves.

Spa water valves are used to control the flow of water or air – to partially or fully shut off the flow, or to redirect it in different directions. Water valves placed before the pump control the suction inlets, like the skimmer and spa drain. Valves after the pump control the flow of water through different banks of spa jets. Valves also allow you to shut off the water flow when cleaning the spa filter or repairing spa equipment.

Spa check valves are used to keep water from flowing backwards through certain pipes. Check valves are also called one-way flow valves, because that’s what they do, allow water to travel in only one direction. Tiny check valves are also used on spa ozone systems, to keep the gas flowing in the right direction, and keep spa water out of the ozonator.

Spa Water Valves

Controlling the flow of water in your spa requires a valve that can handle temperature, chemicals and pressurized water. Spa valves also need to be able to hold a positive seal, or completely shut off the flow of water.

There are 3 types of spa valve design – Ball valves, Guillotine valves and Diverter Valves used on spas and hot tubs.

spa-ball-valveBall Valves

Ball valves have a ball shaped diverter inside, and are made with or without unions (the large nut that allows you to open the valve for repair or service). The pipe connections can be slip or threaded. Ball valves are only available as a 2-way valve – one pipe in, one pipe out. They may be installed on either side of the pool pump, to allow you to service or repair the pump or spa pack. We stock two sizes of a spa union ball valve, to fit 1.5” and 2.0” pipe.

 

guillotine-spa-valveGuillotine Valves

Also called slice valves, a guillotine type spa valve has a flat blade that slides down to block water flow; pull up to open the valve. The end connections can be slip or threaded, male or female, with or without unions, and are only available as a 2-way valve.  Slice valves are the most commonly used valve on hot tubs, and we carry 3 brands: Magic, Valterra and Waterway, to fit 1.5″, 2.0″ and 2-1/2″ pipe.

 

jandy-space-saver-Diverter Valves

With a rotating diverter design, the Jandy valve revolutionized pool and spa plumbing, by creating an easy to use 3-way valve. This design allows for configuration of 2 pipes in, 1 pipe out – or 1 pipe in and two pipes out.  The Jandy Space Saver valve is used in many spas and swim spas, and has 3 slip ports to accept pipe size of 1.5″ or 2.0″. ortega-valves

We also carry Waterway diverter valves, 2-way, 3-way and even 4-way. The Ortega spa valve has a unique internal diverter design, available in 2-way, shown right.

 

Spa Check Valves

spa-check-valvesIf your inground spa drains when the pump shuts off, you may have a bad check valve, designed to keep the water from gravity draining. Your spa air blower also likely has a check valve, to prevent water from entering the blower motor. Ozone check valves are used to keep water out of the ozonator unit.

Spa check valves are spring loaded, and use springs of different thickness, to keep the valve closed until a pressure minimum is reached. Available in 1.5″ and 2.0″, there are spa water check valves, and spa air check valves.

 

If our spa tech support personnel can be of any assistance to you in identifying, or troubleshooting the valves on your spa or hot tub, please call us, or send an email for a fast response.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

Hot Tub Parts: Spa Jet Repair & Replacement

January 10th, 2014 by

lighted-spa-jets are way cool

Spa and hot tub jets – the nozzles where the water and air comes out are really are for me, the distinction in a spa and a hot tub. The jets used in most traditional round wooden hot tubs are neither fancy or numerous. They may not even have a blower, and are more about the hot soak.

A spa on the other hand, can have dozens of spa jets. Some newer spas can have as many as 80 or 100 different jets. Even lighted spa jets, shown here. If you have that many jets, or even far less – eventually you’re going to have some maintenance issue with a few of them.

Full disclosure; we carry over 100 different Spa Jets and over 250 Spa Jet Parts for names like Waterway, Hydro-Air, CMP and many others for easy spa jet repair by the spa owner. Shameless plug complete, moving on…

 

spa-jet-body-jet-insertWHAT IS A SPA JET?

Most jets consist of a Jet Body, which seals up to the backside of the spa wall with a large lock nut ring and lots of silicone. It has the pipe connectors for air and water lines. The inside of the Jet Body houses a Jet Internal, which includes the diffuser insert, escutcheon (bezel or beauty ring) around the jet, and the nozzle or eyeball.

 

IDENTIFYING SPA JETS

As mentioned above, there are hundreds of spa jets, and newer spa jets come in endless configurations of jet type, eyeball type, size and color. Most modern spa jets will allow you to remove the Jet Internal, or Thread-In Jets, as Waterway calls them, by turning counter clockwise on the outer ring, and pulling outward. Inspect the Jet Insert for any part numbers or stampings that would indicate manufacturer. If you need help, give us a call.

Group of 10 different spa jetsMost spa jets are identified by Make – Model – Jet Type – Hole Size – Pipe Size – Color, and other variances. Measuring the outside diameter of the bezel is sometimes sufficient on simple spa jets, while more information may be needed for more advanced jets.

If you don’t know any of the manufacturer information on your spa jet, you could always browse our spa jet pictures to help you visually ID your spa jet. If you still don’t see it, please call us or send a picture by email, with spa jet measurements, and any other information you have about the jet.

TROUBLESHOOTING SPA JETS

By my count, there are some 5 problems affecting spa jets today; and these are Low Flow, No Flow, Broken, Leaking and now a new one – No Lights.

low-flow-spa-jetsLOW FLOW SPA JETS: Check that your pump is on high speed and the jet is not closed by a diverter valve. Many spas have knobs on top that allow you to change the flow between banks of jets. You also need to have air intakes open, especially for spinning jets. If you can remove the spa jet internal, pull it out to inspect the diffuser or mixer assembly for any obvious clogs, from hair or lint. Leaving the most obvious for last, make sure that your water level is high enough and your spa filter is clean.

NO FLOW SPA JETS: Same here, check that the jet pump is on high speed and the jet is not closed by a diverter valve or knob. If you have just drained the spa, and you have a no flow situation, you probably have an air lock in the plumbing system. This can be released by loosening a drain plug or union to allow air to escape. When water begins to leak, tighten up again and retry the tub.

spa-jet-problemsLEAKING SPA JETS: If you have traced a wet spot under the spa as originating from one of your spa jets, there is a fix for that. It may need a new gasket, or sometimes just a dab of Boss silicone will fix it up. Repairs can be made in the front or rear of the jet, to keep water from getting in between the jet and the hole in the spa shell. Check that the ring on the back of the spa jet is very tight. You can use a strap wrench to tighten the lock nut ring on the back of the spa jet, but it’s best to use a lock nut wrench,which also allows you to do the job without a helper.

BROKEN SPA JETS: The eyeball fitting on the inside can become damaged, or can pop out, or be unable to hold position. The threads on a insert spa jet could become stripped, or the bezel ring can become cracked. If you can’t turn the eyeball to a direction you want, try twisting it first to loosen it. Some spa jets have particular methods of adjustment. If you can locate the owner’s manual, in print or online, these can be a big help in some cases.

first-world-problems - spa jet lights not working :-(

NO SPA JET LIGHTS: Spa jet lights not working? My, you really have some first world problems. These are LED and it’s unlikely that the bulb has burned out. More likely to have a problem with the power wire, or the end connectors. Find the cord, and inspect for damage, and be sure that the end plugs are firmly seated, and in the correct spot.

 

SPA JET REMOVAL TOOLS

spa-jet-tools-spa-jet-wrenchesRemoving and replacing the jet body from the shell of the spa, for resealing or replacement, can be accomplished with one specific wrench, made specifically for your spa or hot tub jet. Spa jet tools or spa wrenches are important to make removal easier, without damaging soft plastic edges. For installing a new jet, or resealing a leaking spa jet, they are absolutely essential, to give you the leverage to tightly fit the spa jet body against the spa wall.

Other Spa Jet Tools help you to remove eyeballs or retaining rings. It can be confusing to know which spa wrench to use on your particular spa jet, there are over 30 different tools, and each one works with specific spa jets. Please contact us if you need any help.

1000 words about spa jets. I hope this was helpful to whatever spa jet problem you are having. Most issues are small, and can be fixed quickly.

If you’re having larger problems, and need help identifying which spa jet part or spa jet tool to use – please call our tech department, or send a photo/info by email. You’ll find out team happy to assist in your spa jet repair.

- Jack

 

The Winterized Spa – How to Close a Spa for Winter

December 12th, 2013 by

hot-tub-in-winter

There comes a time for many hot tub lovers in the north, when they need to ask the question – close the spa for the winter, or keep it operating?

If you think you’ll use the spa occasionally, even if it’s only a few times per month, I would suggest that you keep it open. But, if no one is using it, or worse – maintaining it. You may want to winterize the spa.

For many spa owners, it’s the fear of extended power outages that will warrant emptying the spa. Heated and covered, a hot spa should be able to resist freeze damage for 24 hours, but beyond that you could face  expensive repairs to plumbing and equipment.

How to Winterize an Above Ground Spa in 4 Steps

step1 to winterize a spa or hot tub Step One: Remove the spa filter cartridge, and clean it thoroughly with spa filter cleaner like Filter Fresh, and allow it to dry for winter storage. Next, apply a spa purge product like Jet Clean, to clean biofilm and bacteria from the pipes, which will continue to grow in the moist interior of your pipes, unless cleaned before you drain the spa. Don’t skip this step, or you may have funk and gunk in your pipes when you start up the spa again.

 

step2 for spa and hot tub winterizingStep Two: Now it’s time to drain the spa. Shut off power to the spa, and switch the heater off. Find your drain spigot and allow the spa to drain completely, through a hose, so the water drains away from the spa. When almost empty, turn on power again, so you can turn on the air blower (if you have one), and let it run until no more droplets spray out the jets. Use a sponge or shop vac to get every last drop from the bottom of the spa. If you have air jets in the seat or floor, lay a towel over them to absorb water mist as it sprays out.

 

step3 to winterize a hot tubStep Three: Use a powerful shop vac, to suck and blow air through the system. Place a sheet of plastic over a group of spa jets and use shop vac suction on one of the group’s jets. The plastic will suck to the other jets, so you can pull water out of one jet. Repeat until all jets are vacuumed. Switch the vac to a blower, and blow air through all the jets. Now blow air through the skimmer and spa drain. Under the spa, open all unions (don’t lose the o-rings), and use the shop vac to blow and suck air in both directions. Remove the drain plugs on the pump(s), and filter.

 

step4 in winterization of a spaStep Four: Spa covers perform an important function during winter, keeping any rain and snow melt from getting inside the spa. Over winter, some areas can receive two feet of precipitation, and it’s important that this doesn’t get into the spa. If your spa cover is a leaker, and in bad shape, cover it with plywood cut to shape, and then wrap it tightly with a sturdy tarp that will repel water. If your spa cover is in good shape, use a conditioner like our Spa Cover Cleaner, to protect it from winter weather. Use a Spa Cover Cap for the best spa cover protection.

 

Other Thoughts on Winterizing a Portable Spa

  1. Consult your owner’s manual, or find it online, to read specific tips for winterizing your particular spa.
  2. Using non-toxic antifreeze is discouraged, but if you must, refill and drain the spa before use.
  3. Draining a wooden hot tub is discouraged, but if you must, leave a foot of water, to resist shrinkage.
  4. Be sure to shut off power at the breaker, so there’s no chance that the pumps will run without water.
  5. If you have doubts and worry, consider calling a spa service company to winterize your spa.
  6. Inground spas require different procedures, not covered here.

 

- Jack

 

 

Hot Tub Parts: Filter Parts for Spas and Hot Tubs

December 5th, 2013 by

spa-filter-assembly

 

 

Spa Filter Parts – it’s one of the smaller categories of hot tub parts that we carry, and one of the easiest components of your spa to troubleshoot and repair.

Almost all portable, above ground spas use a cartridge filter set-up, similar to the spa filter assembly shown here to the left. A pipe carries water from the skimmer and or spa drain, into the filter body, where the water is forced to pass through the cartridge before exiting the filter on the opposite side.

However – there are many manufacturers of spa filter assemblies, or complete spa filters. In alphabetical order, we carry spa filter parts for Hayward, Jacuzzi, Rainbow, Sonfarrel, Sta-Rite and Waterway.

The first step to finding the right spa filter part is to know which spa filter assembly you have on your spa.

 

Which Brand of Spa Filter do you Have?

As mentioned above, there are many manufacturers of spa filters, and even though we carry parts for the most popular brands, there are dozens more. If you have a Jacuzzi brand spa, it’s a good bet that you also have a Jacuzzi brand filter assembly, but with other makes, you can’t be sure without crawling under there and taking a close look.

spa-filter-logos

You should be able to find the name of the filter manufacturer, or at least a part number stamped onto the filter body, or filter lid to help you determine the make of your filter assembly. Your spa owner’s manual may also help point you in the right direction. Still no luck? Take a photo, and email it to us, we’ll be glad to help.

Which Types of Spa Filter Parts do you Need?

1. Skimmer Parts: That’s right, I said skimmer parts, like the mounting plate or gasket, diverters, skimmer baskets, skimmer weirs… on spas, these are considered to be filter parts. Not so for swimming pools, but on spas and hot tubs, skimmers are often connected to the filter, and in some cases, the spa filter sits inside of the skimmer, underneath the basket, in a combination skimmer and filter body.

2. Filter Body: The filter body is often one of the first things to crack due to freeze damage – even a small amount of water left in the bottom of the filter tank can expand and crack the filter body. When this happens, the filter head or top may also crack, or the filter body lock ring – the large nut that tightens the filter lid to the filter body. If your spa filter is leaking around the lock nut, you may need to replace the o-ring for the filter lid. Probably the most common parts we sell for filter bodies is the drain plug, or the air relief plug – these just seem to grow legs, or roll up under the spa, never to be seen again.

3. Filter Guts: Inside your filter body, we have the filter cartridge. Some spa filters also contain inserts or additional parts that are used to seal up the cartridge, to force the water to go through the filter cartridge and not around the filter cartridge. A few spa filters have an internal bypass parts, to allow excess flow to bypass the cartridge. Yours may have internal o-rings, spacer rings or one-way flow check valves, or small filtering screens.

Ordering Spa Filter Parts

spa-and-hot-tub-electric-parts-sm

Our website displays over 100 different spa filter parts, all with pictures to help you positively identify the correct part – to correct your filter problem. Or, if you want to replace the entire spa filter, we have over 50 different complete spa filters to select from. If you have any confusion, or need any assistance at all, give our helpful and knowledgeable spa part techs a call. Spa Techs are standing by, from 7am – 7pm, Monday thru Friday, and 8-4 on Saturdays. Call 1-800-770-0292.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’
Daniel Lara