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Archive for the ‘Spa Ozone’ Category

Hot Tub Ozone Working? How to Tell

January 10th, 2018 by

It’s a common question we get from hot tub owners – how to tell if a spa ozonator is actually working?

No matter what spa ozone brand you have, eventually it will fail. All spa ozonators will begin to reduce output and will one day suddenly stop producing ozone, but how do you know when that day comes?

Today’s blog post will deal with how a hot tub ozonator works, but more about how it doesn’t work – along with the most popular ways to check ozone output.

It’s good to be skeptical, in these cases – your spa may become unhealthy, and allow bacteria and germs to thrive without an operational ozonator.

 

OZONE INDICATOR LIGHT

This can be a good ‘indicator’ of ozone being produced, if your spa ozonator has a light to indicate ozone production, other lights only indicate power. UV bulb ozonators should emit the usual eerie blue light when operating, and Del spa ozone and others with a CD chip usually have a small vibration sound when operating. However, keep in mind that things can appear normal at the ozonator, when ozone is not actually being produced.

BUBBLES AT OZONE JET

Ozonators produce tiny ‘champagne bubbles’ that are shot into the spa plumbing lines, and eventually work their way to the surface. Smaller bubbles are good, under 1 mm in size, larger bubbles are usually air. Depending on your ozone system, bubbles coming out through the normal jet or port (usually in the footwell area), may not always indicate ozone. Some hot tub ozone systems use air pumps or air venturi fittings that mix air with the ozone, so there are bubbles all the time, even when there is no ozone.

THAT OZONE SMELL

Clothes Pins - the solution to smelly spas and hot tubs?Ozone has a uniquely pungent yet fresh smell, and is recognized by most people in the air at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. It is strongest when lifting the spa cover after hours of being closed. It’s normally easy to smell, in fact, ozone comes from the Greek word ozein, which means ‘to smell’. Another method is to remove the ozone hose from (a plugged) injector, and hold the hose up to sniff for an ozone smell. Faulty check valves or injectors can cause ozone delivery problems, so be sure the entire system is going and flowing.

OZONE TEST KIT

An ozone test kit is available, and they work with a glass ampule that is connected into your ozone hose line (requires assembly). Turn on the ozonator and within a minute the color will change inside the ampule, in the presence of ozone. It won’t measure output exactly, but can give you an approximate level of ozone production. It also is a one time use test, and at $10+ each, not cheap enough to do too often.

POOR WATER QUALITY

Another fine indicator that your ozonator is depleted or not working is that the water quality has suffered or required more maintenance lately. Bouts of cloudy water, lack of sparkle, or even algae may have tipped you off. If you can rule out low pump run time, tired filter cartridge, bad water balance or lack of other sanitizers or shock, then you may have a problem with ozone output.

What Now?

Del MCD-50 spa ozonator shownIf you think that your ozonator is producing less ozone than before or no ozone at all – you are probably correct. Although new ozonators by Del have a 3-5 year lifespan before burning out, older models need a new bulb or renewal kit every 18-24 months. And although it happens, spa ozonators don’t often last far beyond the recommended lifespan. As mentioned earlier – all ozonators will fail, and stop working. It’s best to be prepared, and plan for a scheduled replacement.

New Del Ozone units are small and uncomplicated, to a point that replacement has become an easy DIY job to replace an ozonator. The Del Spa Eclipse or the Del MCD-50 include new hoses, check valve and injectors for a full ozone system replacement. Retrofits to most manufacturer ozone systems easily.

Although spa ozone As an alternative to replacement, many spa and hot tub ozonators have parts available such as replacement bulbs, CD chips and Renewal Kits, to make your system run like new again.ozone-hose

And once again I’d like to remind you – ozone manufacturers recommend that ozone hoses, ozone check valves and ozone injectors be replaced annually, for best results. Quite often you see, an ozonator failure is actually caused by a failure to one of these three key components.

For more information on spa ozonator troubleshooting, repair or installation, see all 20 posts in our Ozone category.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’!

 

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

Spa & Hot Tub Ozone Problems

September 20th, 2017 by

spa ozone bubblesOzone is one of the world’s most powerful sanitizers – over 200 times more powerful than chlorine. But one day your spa ozonator will quietly quit working.

Spa ozone is produced in a small ozonator underneath the spa cabinet, and it is delivered to the water by a small hose that carries the O3 gas to an injector fitting, where it is sucked into the spa plumbing.

But, over time, ozonator output decreases, and after a few years, it’s time for a renovation or replacement of the ozone generator.

 

Is My Spa Ozonator Working?

When released into the water, ozone immediately begins to kill contaminants in your spa – when it’s working. But, how do you know if the ozone is working, or if it’s time for a new spa ozonator?

  1. Fine bubbles in the tub, from the ozone line, a steady stream of fine ‘champagne bubbles’ entering the spa.
  2. Spa ozonators have a power indicator light, which may mean that ozone is being produced.
  3. When you lift the spa cover, you may be able to briefly smell ozone that has gassed-off.
  4. If you remove the ozone hose from the check valve, you should be able to smell the ozone.
  5. Water quality deteriorates when ozone is no longer being produced, requiring more chemicals.
  6. Is your unit past its prime? Ozonators all lose effectiveness and fail after a few years.
    1. UV ozone bulbs last about 2-3 years, less if cycled on/off frequently
    2. Del MCD-50 CD chips last 3-5 years, Del CDS Spa Eclipse models last 2-3 years

Clogged Ozone Injector

ozone-injector Mazzei Ozone Injectors are the point of entry for the ozone gas, a venturi tee manifold, shown here. The injector draws in the ozone, mixing it with the water, where sanitation begins immediately. Injectors have an internal check valve for one-way flow only – ozone can enter the injector, but water cannot exit. If water comes out of the injector cap, or enters the ozone hose – this indicates a clogged or damaged injector check valve.

If an injector becomes clogged with debris, gunk or scale, it will block the small amount of ozone gas pressure. To clean an ozone injector, remove the hose, and ream out the injector with a piece of wire or a very small screwdriver. Vinegar can also be used to help dissolve scale deposits. A new ozone injector will eventually be needed, if the injector is leaking water into the hose.

Broken Ozone Check Valve

A second, inline check valve is used on many spa ozone systems, to prevent water from backing up through the hose, and getting into your ozone unit. This is installed between the ozonator and the injector manifold. Check valves are one-way flow devices, designed to only allow gas (or water) to flow away from the unit.

ozone-check-valveOver time, ozone check valves can become stuck, or blocked by gunk or scale, much like the injector problem discussed above. Del ozone recommends replacing their in-line ozone check valves (shown here) every year. Cleaning a check valve with vinegar can remove deposits, but be sure that the one-way valve is still doing it’s job. You should be able to easily blow air through it, but only in one direction.

Damaged Ozone Tubing

ozone-hoseThe tubing, or hose that carries the ozone from the ozonator to the injection manifold will deteriorate over time. Clear ozone/air hose often becomes yellowed and brittle from the ozone, and will eventually split, requiring replacement.

Inspect your ozone hose often, from end to end for degradation, discoloration or cracking. Del recommends that ozone tubing be replaced every year, to prevent unexpected failure. Also inspect the barbed connections on the end of the hoses. Too much pressure can cause these to crack, and leak ozone.

Expired Spa Ozonator

DEL Ozone MCD-50, it's what I use on my spaFinally, the ozone generator itself may have expired. There are two types of spa ozonators, UV and CD. Most spa ozonators have an indicator light, but they don’t usually have a failure light, so take note of manufacturer replacement recommendations.

Spa ozonators using UV, or ultraviolet light to produce ozone, will need a new UV bulb after a certain number of operational hours, usually 8000-10000 hours. Most UV ozone bulbs will still turn on, or light-up, but no longer produce the wavelengths needed to create ozone, so remember to replace the UV bulb on schedule.

CD, or corona discharge ozonators, will require a new chip or electrode every 3-5 years, to maintain ozone output. Del sells renewal kits for their larger CD ozonators, and it’s quite a simple repair. Newer spa ozonators by Del, such as the MCD-50 and the Spa Eclipse are now so affordable and long lasting, the entire unit is replaced, including hose and check valve (included).

Spa Ozonator Maintenance

Maintaining a spa ozonator is not difficult, once you know what to look for. The most important thing is to replace the ozonator or ozone parts (hose, check valve, bulb, chip) on a schedule, to prevent damage to the ozonator, and poor spa water conditions.

Hot Tub Works carries a full line of spa ozonators, and ozonator parts to keep your spa ozone equipment running smoothly; and doing it’s job.

Your spa ozonator probably won’t make it known that there is a problem – you have to go looking for it. Remember, eventually (2-3 years), your spa ozonator will quietly quit working one day. Maintain your spa ozonator to keep your spa sanitary.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

Installing a Hot Tub Ozonator

August 7th, 2017 by

Ozone is a powerful natural sanitizer that requires only annual attention (or less), and can handle the bulk of your water sanitation. And now, new models of Del spa ozonators now have 5 year lifespan on the CD ozone generator.

Installing a spa ozonator is nearly just as easy. Many spas already come with ozone, or are ‘ozone ready’, with an injection manifold already plumbed in place. Even if your spa has never had an ozonator, installing ozone on a hot tub can be an easy job.

With basic hand tools, and the manufacturer owner’s manual or installation instructions, you are ready to install an ozonator in 3 steps.

  1. Mount the Ozonator Unit inside the Cabinet
  2. Connecting the Ozone Hose to the Injection Manifold
  3. Connecting the Ozonator Unit to Power

 

Mounting the Ozonator

Many hot tub ozone installation manuals will advise to install the ozonator above water level, even though check valves and a ‘Hartford Loop’ in the Ozone Hose will protect the unit from water, described below. For most portable aboveground hot tubs, the ozonator is placed under the cabinet, high up on the wall, in an accessible area with good air circulation. For inground spas or for tubs with equipment sheds, if you can mount the ozonator above the water level easily, by all means do, but it is not a strict requirement.

Use all screws to firmly attach the ozonator unit to the wall or stud, high up on the inside wall. A secondary piece of plywood can be used for added strength, and to prevent drilling through the spa cabinet from the inside. Mount in a location that indicator or status lights can easily be seen and future maintenance or replacement can be easily accomplished.
 

Connecting the Ozone Hose to the Injection Manifold

Ozone Ready Spas: An ozone ready spa will already have an Ozone Injector plumbed in place, or may utilize an Ozone Jet Fitting to draw the ozone into the spa. Or you may just need to add an Ozone Injector to the pipe already designated for ozone, both described below, but – check your owner’s manual for ozone details.

For spas and hot tubs that have not had an ozonator before, and are not ‘ozone-ready’, there are 3 ways to introduce the ozone gas into the water line.

  1. ozone-injectorPlumb an Ozone Injector into a 3/4″ Water Hose: For this method, locate the 3/4″ diameter water hose that leads to one of your spa jets. Choose a jet on the ‘end of the line’, or by itself, and preferably near the bottom of the tub if possible, to give the ozone another second or two to work as it bubbles up to the surface. Coordinate the ozonator installation with a drain & refill of the tub, unless you have a valve or other means to stop water flow while the injector is quickly inserted. Cut the hose with a razor knife or shears, and push the hose over the Ozone Injector and clamp firmly in place. The injection fitting, where the Ozone hose connects, should be facing up, and the indicator arrows should point in the direction of water flow. If there are no arrows, the end that you cannot blow air into, is the exit for the water.
  2. Attach Ozone Hose to a Spa Jet Air Intake: Most spa jets are combination Air and Water jets, mixing at the jet for increased force. Some spa jets receive air from an Air Manifold, and on other spas using ‘Stacked Jets‘, the air line runs in/out of each jet, and to the next. If you have a single hose and a single air port on your spa jets, cut the hose at the manifold and at the jet, and plug the manifold end. For a stacked jet configuration, remove one jet from the air loop, bypassing that valve, and use adapters and plugs to connect your Ozone Hose.
  3. Plumb an Ozone Injector Manifold: This method uses a large PVC manifold to connect to your 1.5″ or 2″ PVC plumbing – after the pump and heater. You will need about 24″ of clear space to install the large manifold, or with several 90° fittings, you can create the space. Glue the manifold in place, and you are ready to connect your Ozone hose.

Hartford Loop & Check Valve: In addition to the connection point for the Ozone Hose, you also need to run the hose in a loop above water level, and install a check valve, to prevent water from backing up into the ozonator, which could easily damage or destroy the unit.

A Hartford Loop is simply running the hose above the water level with a 6-8″ wide loop, in between the ozonator and the injector. An ozone check valve is then placed in the ozone hose, between the loop and the injector, as redundant protection against water damage.

All Ozone check valves will fail eventually, and should be replaced every 12-18 months, as a preventative measure. Ozone Hose also becomes brittle in a few years, and should also be on a replacement schedule.
 

Connecting the Ozonator Unit to Power

Most hot tub ozonators are equipped with either a J&J mini plug or AMP plug, to connect directly to your spa controller circuit board, and as such, is controlled by your system to only operate when the pump low speed is operating, instead of running 24 hours per day. If your ozonator comes with an AMP plug, but you have J&J plugs, short ozone adapter cords are used to connect to your spa pack.

For hot tubs without a spa pack controller, or old systems without an ozone connection port, the power wires can be hard-wired directly to the spa pump time clock, to operate only when the pump is operating, preferably only on low speed. You can also connect your ozone hose into the plumbing of a 24 hour circulation pump.

Finally, if your spa has a GFCI outlet powered by the pump or controller, you can power the ozonator directly into the 115V outlet with a regular 3-Prong grounded plug.

 

 

– Jack

 

 

Spa & Hot Tub Noises

July 11th, 2016 by

loud-hot-tub-vibration-noiseSpas and Hot Tubs are not too dissimilar to automobiles, and I’ve made that reference before. And just like cars, a hot tub making funny noises is enough to make you sit up and take notice.

Today’s post is all about noisy hot tubs and spas, or sounds that spas make – what might be it, where to look, and how to reduce or correct hot tub noise.

Vibration Noise on Spas

Vibration noise coming from a hot tub is all too common, and the source of much friction between neighbors. Hot tub noise nuisance or noise from a neighbor’s hot tub can lead to noise complaints. But there are ways to reduce hot tub noise and save your neighborly relations.

There are two causes of spa vibration noise, 1. Hot Tubs sitting on small wooden decks, and 2. Hot Tub equipment vibration, underneath the spa.

In the first case, outdoor wood decks act like a drum and resonate a low frequency that sounds like a constant drone, even with pumps on low speed. The sound can be amplified as it conducts through nearby fences or reflects off exterior walls. To correct this situation, the wood deck can be cut-out to fit the spa, with a 4″ thick reinforced concrete slab poured for the spa to rest on. Another option would be to place thick rubber mats, or patio squares underneath the entire spa, on top of the wood deck. These can also be used on concrete patios that are connected to the house to reduce hot tub vibration noise. In addition to these two sound solutions, tall planters or short fences can be used adjacent to the hot tub/spa, to reflect sound away from the house(s) toward a more open area.

In the second case, vibration can come from the equipment located under the spa cabinet. Circulation pumps and jet pumps are the usual suspects, check that the base bolts are tight on each pump, or install them if they are missing. Alternatively, you can place a thick rubber mat underneath to dampen pump vibration noises. The Spa Pack or blower could also be the culprit. Placing your hand on pumps, valves, spa pack – you should be able to feel what you hear, and can tighten the equipment to the base, or use dense dampening rubber squares beneath. You can also use sound dampers or insulating material on the inside of the cabinet wall panels to contain spa equipment noise.

There is a third case, and that’s hot tubs that are up on a concrete slab, located against the house, or under a bedroom window. Even on low speed operation, they can be annoying to light sleepers. In this situation, you could adjust the timer to run only during day time hours, or add a dampening sub-floor to absorb some of the sound. A small enclosure around the hot tub, either a pavilion or large wooden wall planters, can be used to contain and deflect the sound away from the house.

Clicking

A spa or hot tub that makes a clicking sound may be working just fine, but if the pump won’t turn on high speed, and all you hear is clicking, or the heater is not heating and you hear a clicking noise, they may be coming from spa relays or contactors. If you try to locate the offending part – do so carefully, with the power turned off, as a shock hazard may exist.

Squealing

A spa or hot tub that makes a squealing noise will usually have a pump that is nearing the end of a lifespan. The motor bearings specifically, eventually wear out after a number of years, and will begin to shriek like a banshee! The sound becomes progressively louder over time, and not fixing it will lead to motor failure. To verify that the sound is bad bearings, close all valves and remove the motor from the wet end. Turn on power for a few seconds and if it still makes the noise, you need a motor rebuild from a local motor shop, or replace your motor with a new motor, or buy a whole new pump.

Softer squeals may be heard on spas coming from open air intake jets or some spa ozonators make a low squeal when they are operating.

Humming

A pump motor that is not starting may make a humming sound, from the motor capacitor. Sometimes the humming noise precedes the popping of the circuit breaker. Another usual source for a spa humming noise is vibration – either of the sub-floor beneath the spa, or the equipment housed beneath the spa. As suggested above, check that all equipment is tightly secured, or strapped if needed. Rubber patio squares can also be used to

Buzzing

Now a buzzing sound… that may also be the same as a squealing or humming sound, and can even be a variation on the clicking sound. In other words, it could be the pump or blower motor that is having trouble starting, a heater contactor or relay. Some ozonators have a faint squeal to them. To find out what’s making all that noise, first check your control panel for any error codes, and barring that, stick your head under there with a flashlight, and listen…

 

stop-look-listen-againAnd that’s really the secret to troubleshooting a noisy Jacuzzi or hot tub, look and listen – and you will likely find the cause of any spa or hot tub noises or odd sounds.

 

– Jack

 

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Hot Tub Ozonator VS. UV Light VS. Minerals

May 16th, 2016 by

OZONE-VS-UV-VS-MINERALS
When it comes to sanitizing your spa or hot tub, you have a lot of choices. When I first started hot tubbing, we didn’t have all these fancy purifiers, and until the 80’s we had to use pool chemicals!

Chlorine and Bromine are an easy way to keep the water constantly protected. But – there’s a dark side! It smells bad, bleaches suits, dries skin and hair, and can be unsafe to store and use.

And that’s why a cottage industry sprung up, offering alternatives to traditional sanitation methods. Let’s talk about all 3 – Ozonators, Ultra Violet light, and Mineral Purifiers.

Hot Tub Ozone

del-mcd50-ozoneHow it Works: Ozone is called the ‘World’s Most Powerful Sanitizer’ and indeed packs quite a punch. An ozonator or ozone generator shoots a small electric charge across an air filled gap to separate oxygen O² into O¹. The singular oxygen atom quickly bonds to a nearby O² molecule, to become O³, or Ozone. The additional oxygen atom makes O³ very unstable, destroying any unfortunate particle that gets in the way.

Down Side: Ozone is cheap to produce, however the circulation pump must be running, to draw the gas into the line. When the pump is off, ozone is not being produced. Ozone also has a very short life, and due to the gaseous state, it will rise to the surface and gas-off quickly.

Maintenance: Spa ozonators require replacement of the ozone tubing and check valve every 1-2 years. CD (Corona Discharge) models require CD Chip replacement every 1-2 years, while AGP (Advanced Plasma Gap) units can last up to 5 years.

Effectiveness: Using a spa ozonator can allow you to reduce reliance on high levels of chlorine and bromine, by as much as 50%, according to manufacturers. Ozone destroys Giardia, Pseudomonas and Crypto and is a powerful oxidizer.

Hot Tub UV Light

spectralightuv-lampHow it Works: UV light purifiers work by irradiating the water, as it rushes by a UV lamp that is producing a specific wavelength 254 nm within the UV-C spectrum. When exposed to UV light of this specific wavelength, living particles actually have their DNA rearranged and become unable to reproduce. This renders the particles as inert, and only from a millisecond of exposure to the UV-C light.

Down Side: Like Ozone, UV light is cheap to produce, but is only being produced while the pump is running, pushing water over the UV-C light bulb or lamp. UV system strength can be reduced by high water flow rates, cloudy water and water temperature. And it has no ‘shelf life’, sanitation only takes place for an instant, while the water is passing under the eerie blue light.

Maintenance: Spa UV light systems use a special bulb to create the UV-C light. In most cases, these bulbs will need to be replaced every 1-2 years, as they begin to lose effectiveness over time. Cleaning the quartz lens regularly is also recommended, to remove dust or grime deposits.

Effectiveness: Like Ozone, UV purification is a tried and true secondary sanitizer, and can reduce your reliance on chlorine or bromine. It also inactivates (renders inert) parasites and pathogens like Ozone, when sized and used properly.

Hot Tub Mineral Purifiers

spa-mineral-sticks-for-hot-tubsHow They Work: Mineral purifiers for hot tubs and spas are slim cartridges that you drop into the hole in your cartridge filter. They’re filled with Silver and Copper pellets which slowly dissolve at a controlled rate. The silver and copper act together as a biocide, with silver oxide as the sanitizer and copper working as an algaecide. Using a mineral stick, like the others, can allow you to reduce chlorine or bromine usage by up to 50%.

Down Side: Mineral sticks for spas are also not as powerful as ozone, and cannot kill the strongest of pathogens that may come into the water, although they come close.

Maintenance: Most mineral sticks are replaced every 4 months, when the silver and copper depletes. No other equipment involved, so no other maintenance is needed.

Effectiveness: Unlike ozone and UV, mineral sticks create lasting protection by maintaining a residual of silver in the water. You will notice an immediate improvement in water quality and can appreciate using less sanitizer or filter aids to keep the water clear.

 

Your mileage may vary, but having a secondary sanitizer makes sense and is recommended by the MAHC (Model Aquatic Health Code). It can help reduce reliance on harsh chlorine or bromine, and also acts as a nice back-up for those occasional gaps in coverage, if you know what I mean.

In most cases, all of these systems tend to cost the spa owner about $100 per year, but you can realize some savings in other chemical costs, and will enjoy the peace of mind knowing that your spa water is extra-clean, I know I do! I use Nature2 and Del Ozone on my own spa.

 

– Jack

 

 

Del Spa Ozone Maintenance

October 19th, 2015 by

new-spa-eclipse-newOzone has been used in spa and hot tubs for years, as a powerful sanitizer that kills 99.9% of pathogens and contaminants.

When used with a spa mineral stick, an ozonator can do the bulk of spa water sanitizing, requiring only a small amount of bromine, and/or regular spa shock to oxidize organics that hide in small spaces, away from the ozone.

BUT – Ozonators Wear Out! They need to be rejuvenated or renewed – by replacing the ozone bulb, chip or electrode. In addition, hoses, injection fittings and check valves also need regular replacement.

Hot Tub Ozone Maintenance:

You can do your own spa and hot tub ozone maintenance. A screwdriver is usually all that’s needed, and directions for repair or replacement of a spa ozonator are simple and easy to follow, even if you are repair-challenged!

Replacing Ozone Hose:

ozone-hoseOzone is a very powerful gas that breaks down the ozone tubing over time. Nitric acid is created in small amounts, and within 2 years the hose will begin to weaken so much that a hole will burn right through it, spilling ozone into the spa cabinet. Inspect the hoses twice per year, visually for any staining and by hand for thin spots. Ozone Hose Lifespan: 1-2 years.

Spa Ozone Check Valve Maintenance:

SPA-PARTS-OZONE-CHECK-VALVEA Check Valve is a one way flow valve, allowing the ozone to travel in one direction only. It connects in the hose between the ozonator and injector. Ozone Check Valves can only be installed in one direction (in the direction of the Flow –> arrow). Eventually, the check valve will need to be replaced (with an exact duplicate) or it can damage your ozonator by allowing incorrect ozone flow. Ozone Check Valve Lifespan: 1-2 years.

Spa Ozone Injector Maintenance:

ozone-injectorThe ozone injector is usually a small 3-way manifold or Tee, which fits into a larger 3/4″ or 1″ hose. In the middle is a smaller hose connection, where the ozone hose is attached. Injectors don’t commonly fail, but they do clog quite often. If you have no ozone bubbles in your spa, chances are you have a clogged ozone injector. They can clog with calcium or chemical build-up, and block the flow of ozone bubbles, which usually enter at a floor spa jet.

To clean a clogged ozone injector, remove the hose and hose fitting from the injector. With the spa running, simply insert a bent paper clip or tiny eyeglass screwdriver and move it back and forth to break up and suck in any crusty deposits that block ozone from flowing into the injector. Then reconnect the ozone hose and you should see ozone bubbles in the spa again. Ozone Injector Life Span: 10 years.

Spa Ozone Generator Renewal:

The engine of a spa ozone generator, the device that actually creates O³ from O² eventually wears out and will need to be replaced. Be prepared for the day when the ozone bubbles stop suddenly, and your spa water grows quickly dark and turbid.

Spa ozone is created in 2 ways – with a UV bulb or with Corona Discharge, which creates a small electrical charge to create ozone, like a tiny lightning bolt. Corona Discharge (CD) units are powered by a chip or electrode. CD units last much longer than UV bulbs, but newer models can last over 5 years.

UV Ozone Bulb Replacement: If you no longer see the eerie blue glow coming from the inspection port of your long, tubular ozone bulb housing, check that it is still plugged into a power outlet. If all good, order the exact replacement bulb, if still available. Actually, a better recommendation would be to replace the outdated bulb unit with a longer lasting CD unit. Ozone Bulb Life Span: 1-2 years.

spa-eclipse-renewal-kitCorona Discharge CD Chip Replacement:  After several years, the CD chip will wear out on ozonators like the Spa Eclipse. It will wear out especially fast if you are running the circulation pump 24 hrs per day. Whenever the pump is running, CD chip ozonators produce ozone. Replacing a CD chip on a Del Spa Eclipse is very easy. Simply unplug the power cord to the unit and remove the back screws. Locate the CD chip, in the bottom of the case, and disconnect the wire plugs. Reconnect the new cell the same way, and you’re back in business! Del Ozone CD Chip Life Span: 2-3 years.

mcd-50-renewal-kitCorona Discharge Ozone Cell Replacement: The Del MCD-50 ozonator uses an electrode that can last much longer than the CD chip used in the Spa Eclipse. But eventually it too will wear out, and it has an indicator light to let you know. Renewal kits for the  MCD-50 include a new Ozone Cell, Power Supply, Hose Barb, O-ring and Fuse. Pull off the cover (with the power off), and you can replace all 5 parts in under 5 minutes, OK, maybe ten. Replace the front cover and test it out. MCD-50 Cell Life Span: 3-5 years.

del-ozone-apgSpa Eclipse NEXT GENERATION uses the new APG technology – Advance Plasma Gap.  The latest and greatest spa ozonator, it has more ozone output and last longer than it’s predecessors. It also has an auto voltage sensor, so you can connect to 115V or 230V without switching wires or settings. The maintenance to the Next Generation ozonators is the same for hoses and check valves, but the AGP cell is not sold as a part, you just replace the entire box, which is a small job of unmounting and remounting, and connecting the hoses and wire plug. APG Module Life Span: 4-6 years.

How to Know if a Spa Ozonator is Working? 

  • Ozone bubbles are visible in the Spa, at a lower jet, or the heater jet, usually.
  • Ozone smell when you open up the spa cover after being closed for some time.
  • Indicator light on the ozone module, as a visual indicator of operation.
  • Test it with the new Del Ozone test kit.

Spa Ozonators don’t last forever! If your spa ozonator troubleshooting has led you to this page – consider the possibility that your ozone device (bulb, chip, electrode, cell) is no longer producing ozone. They don’t go bad gradually, they go all-of-a-sudden. One evening you’ll lift the spa cover and discover dull and lifeless spa water. Shock the spa and order your spa ozone parts, hoses and check valve – to keep your ozonator running in top condition!

And remember, you don’t have to stick with the branded ozonator that came with your spa (it was probably made by Del anyway!).

XOXO;

Gina Galvin
Hot Tub Works

 

 

Spa and Hot Tub Ozone Generators

August 10th, 2015 by

spa ozone bubblesBefore there was ozone, it’s amazing we kept spas clean. We drained them a lot. An ozonator generator can kill 99.99% of impurities in a spa or hot tub. There’s almost nothing it won’t kill.

Ozonators typically last about 2-3 years before needing a regeneration kit, or replacement. The new Spa Eclipse can last up to 5 years, and uses Del’s new Plasma Gap ozone generation technology.

Adding ozone to a portable or inground spa is a simple affair, with installation possible in under 10 minutes. Install ozone on your spa, to both purify the water and invigorate your senses.

Del Spa Eclipse

spa-eclipse-newThe New Spa Eclipse Next Generation Corona Discharge system is the new kid on the block and replaces all previous versions. Featuring DEL’s exclusive Advanced Plasma Gap technology, the newly engineered design is now equipped with Auto Voltage Sensing. Higher ozone output and longer life than other CD technology, the DEL Ozone Spa Eclipse is the ultimate solution for water treatment in spa applications. Considerably more energy efficient than UV ozone generators, the Spa Eclipse is lower in overall power consumption, heat generation and operating cost Includes Ozone supply tubing, check valve, mounting screws, installation manual, and water chemistry guide. For hot tubs up to 750 gallons.

Dimensions: 5”H x 3.4”W x 2.3”D, 1lb
Output: 50-70 mg/hr;
Power Consumption: 110V/220V = 10W

Del MCD-50

del-spa-mcd-50The Del MCD-50 is for spas or hot tubs that want higher ozone production for optimal water quality. MCD-50 is serviceable and reliable with the longest lifespan of any spa ozone generator on the market, typically running for five years. The MCD-50 has a 50 milligram/hour ozone output, and also uses less power than many larger spa ozone generators. Uses a ceramic tube Corona Discharge method to quickly produce ozone. Mounts to the inside of spa or hot tub panel. Includes 44 inch cord with 4-pin AMP plug; ozone supply tubing, check valve, mounting screws, installation manual, and water chemistry guide. UL Listed, for hot tubs up to 1000 gallons.

Dimensions: 8.6”H x 6.1”W x 2.8”D, 3.75 lb
Output: 50 mg/hr; 580 PPM; 2cfh
Power Consumption: 110V = 50mA, 6W / 220V = 35mA, 9W

Installation of a Del Spa Ozonator

del-ozone-installation-in-a-spa-or-hot-tubTo install a Del MCD-50 or Spa Eclipse in your spa, find a suitable mounting location on the inside cabinet, above the return line (after the pump and heater). Place it as high as possible on the underside of the spa cabinet.

The ozonator doesn’t have to be located directly above the injection point, but it should be within a few feet. If the unit is mounted above water level, the hose can run straight to the injector, but if installed below water level, loop the hose up above the water level on it’s way to the injector.ozone-injector

Most spas or hot tubs that area “Ozone Ready” have an ozone venturi manifold, or vacuum injection point already installed on the spa return line. For an older spa or wood hot tub adding an ozone generator, you can install an ozone injector to your return hose. Just cut the hose and push it over the barbed ends of the injector, and connect the hose to the injector fitting and tighten down the hose nut.

After mounting the unit, connect the ozone supply tubing and connect the 4-pin AMP plug to the ozone (or accessory) port on your spa pak controller.

OZONE-MOLECULEOzone is the world’s most powerful sanitizer. Adding it to your spa can help ensure a bacteria-free hot tub or spa. If you have any questions on how to add an ozonator for hot tub or spa, give us a call – we have spa techs standing by!

 

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

CDC Report on Recreational Water Illness

August 6th, 2015 by

CBS-News-Sick-SwimThe media is all abuzz about a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control that shows that Recreational Water Illness (RWI’s) are on the rise in American pools and spas.

Since 2010, a National Outbreak Notification System (NORS) has been established that allows public pool and spa operators to voluntarily report any outbreak of water related illness.

For the 2011-2012 reporting period, NORS has documented 1300 RWI’s in public pools and spas, with 75 hospitalizations and one reported death. Over half of the illnesses were caused by Cryptosporidium, or Crypto as it is more ominously known. Pseudomonas accounted for the majority of other illnesses.

What Causes Recreational Water Illness?

Where does it come from – it comes from bathers! Mostly from unwashed behinds, or from “accidental fecal release” of those infected with the parasite. Very tiny amounts of poop from an infected person can infect others – who accidentally drink the water, or absorb it into their eyes or open sores.

Crypto and other pathogens are not only found in human and animal stools, but can also be found in soil, food and on unclean surfaces. It can enter the spa in more ways than just the backside of an infected person. The CDC estimates that 750,000 Americans are infected each year with Cryptosporidium.

 

Why Doesn’t Chlorine Kill Crypto?

DEL Ozone MCD-50, it's what I use on my spa

Usually it does, but cryptosporidium has the ability to cloak itself from low levels (1-3 ppm) of chlorine or bromine. And if the pool or spa has high pH and/or a high level of chloramines – it becomes a very weak sanitizer, not strong enough to kill all pathogens. For this reason, the CDC recommends supplemental sanitation by Ozone or UV light systems, for pools or spas that have a high risk or history of infection.

 

Reducing Recreational Water Illness Risks

  • Shower with soap before using a pool or spa
  • Do not use a pool or spa if you’ve had recent diarrhea
  • Maintain spa bromine at 3-5 ppm, and use Ozone or UV
  • Balance the pH and shock the spa after each use
  • Keep your head above water and don’t drink the water
  • Limit spa sessions to 15 minutes

 

Is Your Hot Tub – Infected with Crypto?

bacteria-in-spasIt could happen, all it takes is one infected person who hasn’t showered to infect a spa or hot tub. The data collected by the CDC is entirely gathered from Public pools and spas, not residential – but a residential spa can become infected just as easily – all you need is an unclean bather, insufficient sanitation and poor water balance.

But I don’t mean to scare you – I would estimate that 90% of well-maintained residential spas are pathogen-free. When in doubt, shock the spa or change the water!

 

– Jack

 

 

 

 

Spa Foam: Eliminating Hot Tub Foaming

March 6th, 2014 by

foamy-hot-tubMy family and I took a short holiday recently, to a large theme park in Anaheim – I think you know the one I’m referring to. Well, we stayed in one of their theme hotels, which had a nice pool and spa. The spa water looked a little cloudy, but we got in anyway (after I checked the sanitizer level, lol). Turned on the bubbles, and whoa – did we get bubbles! Foam was nearly a foot high off the water. My kids thought it was hilarious fun and my wife didn’t seem to mind. I was disgusted, quite frankly.

Spa and Hot Tub foam is just plain nasty, when you know what has created the foaming water. A hot tub is not just a small pool – think of it as more of a large bath tub. When several people hop into a hot tub, the water becomes saturated with chemicals and soaps used on our skin, hair and bathing suits.

Causes of Hot Tub Foam

Every time you use your spa, the warm water absorbs dead skin cells, perspiration and dirt, and also lotions, oils, soaps, cosmetics and hair products. Over time, these invisible solids build up in the water, making the water ‘thick’.

Spa water chemistry also plays a role. A high pH and alkalinity and/or low calcium hardness levels creates an ideal condition for foaming. Add spa calcium increaser if you have soft water in your area, and your calcium hardness level is below 150 ppm. And, maintaining your pH level at 7.4-7.6 and your alkalinity in the range of 80-120 ppm will not only help prevent foaming, but has many other advantages.

Solutions to Hot Tub Foam

Spa Shock can break down many of these substances and reduce spa foaming in most cases, but spa shock has trouble removing oils and phosphates from the water.

Spa Enzymes can be used to break down oily, soapy substances, naturally. Enzymes actively seek and consume oils and scum which contribute to hot tub foam.

Spa Defoamer can be used to instantly remove spa foam. It’s a silicone solution that when sprayed on the surface, reduces surface tension, and spa foam disappears (if only temporarily).

Preventing Hot Tub Foam

The options above will do well to control a foamy hot tub, and keep the foaming to a minimum – but, it’s not really solving the problem.

Draining the Spa is the ultimate and inevitable solution to hot tub foaming. To prevent foaming caused by BioFilm, use Jet Clean before draining, at least once per year. If you can’t do a complete drain, you can drain half of the spa, and refill – and although it’s not a full drain & clean, you can fix a foaming spa problem, at least temporarily, in this manner.

Taking a shower before using the spa is always recommended, especially if you need to shower – and I think you know what I mean. Don’t use the spa as a bathtub.

Don’t Submerge if you have long hair, put your hair up to keep hair products out of the tub. Even those with short hair can bring in shampoo, conditioner and hair gel into the tub when they go under water.

Rinse your swimsuit in hot water if you have laundered them. Avoid wearing T-shirts or clothing that has been washed with soap. Trace amounts in your clothing or bathing suits will cause spa foaming.

Maintain Water Balance, with particular care to your pH, calcium and sanitizer levels.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

Spa Maintenance & Safety for Rental Home Hot Tubs

February 24th, 2014 by

cabin-spa

 

Do you own or operate a rental cabin or B&B with a hot tub for the guests to use? If so, you know that a spa can significantly increase the appeal of the property for renters, but that it also brings with it another layer of maintenance in between guest stays.

My husband and I have had a mountain home near Mammoth Lakes, Ca that we rent out when we are not using it, through a rental agency. Over the past 15 years, I have many stories to tell about our little mountain spa.

Like the time we found broken champagne glasses in the bottom, or the time we discovered it missing nearly 1/3 of the water, or the many times we have found it left uncovered, cranked up to the max and low on water.

Here’s a list of ways to improve management of your rental home hot tub, and reduce surprises and potential conflicts with your guests.

Signs

I’m a big believer in signs all around the house – small, tasteful signs that I print up and laminate. Here’s a sample of some useful signs around your spa:spa-rules-sign

  1. Spa Rules – Standard sign warning of potential health dangers.
  2. Spa Operation – Custom sign telling how to remove cover, turn on jets, air, heater, lights. How to add water if needed. How to shock if needed.
  3. Spa Closing – Sign by the door, reminding users to turn off the spa, replace the spa cover and latch it securely.
  4. Spa Heating – Tips on spa heating, troubleshooting checklist of simple fixes for the spa temperature.

 

Equipment

In order to be sure that our spa stays as sanitary as possible, we have a small inline brominator installed under the skirt, an ozonator, and we use a mineral stick. In most cases this amount of overkill is not needed, but it can be a little insurance against the occasional group of guests that really push sanitation to the limit, with heavy spa use.

The spa filter cartridge should be replaced every 6 months in a heavily used spa, or at least that’s the schedule we keep. We buy 6 at a time, and keep them stocked at the property. Same with the mineral sticks, which gets replaced at the same time.

Draining Schedule

We have a formula that we use to calculate when to drain the spa, based on the number of guests, but we also try to tell whether or not the spa has seen heavy use. The water level is always a good indicator, since most guests will never add water. If the water level is close to the level where we always leave it at, and other indicators don’t point to heavy spa use, we don’t drain the spa after each guest, but we vacuum, clean the filter, balance the chemistry and shock the spa.

However, in order to maintain a sanitary spa in your rental, you should drain and refill the spa if it looks like your guests really enjoyed it! Our spa gets drained about every month, but sometimes twice per month, if the unit has seen heavy usage, or if we rent to snowboarders (jk, lol).

Spa Safety

First off, the spa should be isolated on your property. If there are adjacent town homes or condos, a safety fence should be built around the patio, to cordon off the spa, and also add some privacy.

Secondly, a covered spa is always safer than an uncovered spa. Make sure your cover clips and straps are in good shape. A spa cover lifter should be installed to protect your spa cover and prevent guest injury.

Third, our Spa Rules sign makes these specific restrictions:

  1. Children under 14 with Adults only
  2. No single use, 2-4 people only
  3. No alcohol or drugs
  4. No pregnant women
  5. No Hypertensive people

Fourth, keep all spa chemicals safely stored, and out of the reach of children.

Fifth, make sure that your spa is in good electrical condition, without any chance of accidental electrocution.

What’s a Spa Worth?

Adding a spa or hot tub to your rental property will add another recreational element to your offerings, and will allow you to charge a premium – to at least cover the additional costs and maintenance involved. In our case, our property management company raised their price a set amount, and we have figured out our annual expenses for the spa. From there, we were able to figure out a fair amount to add to a night’s rental, which has by now, over the last 10 years ~ paid for the spa many times over!

 

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works