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Archive for the ‘spa filter’ Category

5 ways to Improve your Spa Filtration

August 29th, 2013 by

water-animated-6

 

Is your spa filter too small? Having the best spa filtration you can get will not only make your water cleaner and clearer, but will make it safer and easier to manage, with fewer chemicals.

Without further ado, let’s get on with it – here are 5 ways you can improve your spa or hot tub filtration. If you have tips of your own to add, leave a comment at the bottom of the post.

 

 

Spa Filters with more Square Footage

Some of the more popular spa filters we sell are available in two different square footage. For instance, the HTF-2370 has the same dimensions as the HTF-2390, but the former is 25 square foot of filter surface area and the latter is 50 square feet. This is accomplished by adding more pleats to the cartridge – double the pleats and you double the square footage! Spa filters with more square footage are more expensive, but doubling the surface area will give you longer filter cycles and better overall filtration.

Clean Spa cartridge with Filter Cleaner

Cleaning your pool filter cartridge is an important task that shouldn’t be rushed. Cleaning between each pleats with a garden hose to flush out the dirt and work loose debris in the fabric. To loosen the dirt trapped in the spun polyester fabric, use a filter cleaner before hosing the cartridge clean. Just add the recommended amount to a bucket of water, and soak your cartridge for the time specified. Then hose it clean. Spa filter cleaners loosen mineral deposits, dirt and oils, to allow your cleaning to be much more effective.

Replace your Spa Cartridge on Schedule

I usually recommend that people replace their cartridge on schedule, every 12 – 24 months. The wide range depends on how often you use your spa, and how often the filter needs cleaning. Spa cartridge filters are not meant to last forever. The fibers loosen, and allow particles to begin to bypass over time. It’s a generally accepted notion that you should replace your cartridge after 12-15 cleanings. I have a reminder set on my Outlook calendar that helps me remember when to replaced my spa filter, which helps me keep on schedule.

Drain your Spa on Schedule

I usually recommend that people drain their spa on schedule, every 3-6 months. Here too, the range depends on how often you use the spa, how large the spa is compared to usage, and how well the overall water quality and water balance has been. Over time, total dissolved solids can build up which interferes with water balance. Draining the spa also gives you a chance to use a biofilm remover, like Jet Clean to clean the pipes and hoses of bacteria and polish up the spa with a cleaner like Citrabright.

Use Enzymes or Clarifiers

Spa enzymes are a natural product that digests body oils, make-up, soaps and other sticky substances. Added to your spa, it will reduce sanitizer demand and increase your filter cycles while making your filter more effective. These are the same type of enzymes used in cleaning up oil spills in the ocean, so it can handle your little spa or hot tub oil problem. Using a spa clarifier is another way to increase your spa cartridge filtration, by coagulating small particles into larger, more easily filtered clumps.

Some spas and hot tubs have woefully undersized cartridge filters. If you can’t upsize the filter, you can use these tactics above to improve your filtration, or to compensate for poor filtration, without resorting to heavy doses of sanitizer.

- Jack

 

The Chlorine Free Spa – Is it Possible?

July 22nd, 2013 by

no-chlorine

It’s a common question that we get in our call center – can I run my spa (or hot tub) without chlorine? My quick and smart answer is usually “sure, you can use bromine!” Then they say “isn’t that the same thing?” It’s not really, as bromine has less of a smell, is not quite as harsh on skin and hair, and has other advantages over chlorine.

But seriously – the real answer is Yes!, you can run your spa without chlorine, or bromine, and still have a safe and sanitary spa. It requires using some modified methods, to make sure that pathogens don’t thrive – but it can be successfully done. Here’s how.

 

Replace your Filter Cartridge More Frequently

For most spas under halogen treatment (chlorine or bromine), I recommend that the spa filter cartridge be replaced every 12-24 months, depending on it’s size, and on how much the spa is used. For those who wish to go chlorine free in the spa or hot tub, I’d recommend that you double the frequency, and replace your spa filter every 6-12 months.

Some spa filters are available with more square footage. When you search for a replacement spa filter, by dimensions, model number or cartridge number, you may see two spa filters listed that have the same dimensions, but one costs more. The more expensive spa cart will have more pleats and thus more surface area, which will do a better job of filtering.

Drain your Spa or Hot Tub More Frequently

Draining the water out of your spa should be done every 4-6 months, depending on your rate of usage, or if the water goes bad. For those using a non-chlorine method in the spa, increase the frequency to every 2- 3 months, or at least every 4 months.

When draining a non-chlorine spa, be sure to use a Spa Purge product to remove any build up inside the pipes, hoses and jets of your spa. Without a halogen residual, biofilms can form faster and create a bio-hazard in your spa water. I use Jet Clean every other time that I drain my spa, to keep organics and oils from building up in hidden crevices.

Ozone + Minerals

DEL Ozone MCD-50, it's what I use on my spa

For a spa that doesn’t use chlorine or bromine, you need something to kill bather waste and bacteria. My recommendation is to use a spa ozonator and a mineral sanitizer, like Nature2 or Spa Frog. The combination of these two – an ozone sanitizer and a mineral purifier, takes care of most disease causing bacteria.

Check on your ozonator regularly to be sure that it’s on and operational, and replace the mineral cartridge as directed, to keep a proper amount of silver and copper ions working. These two treatments working together will do most of the job in keeping your spa water healthy.

Non-Chlorine Shock

cense

Ozone + Minerals do most of the job, but to be sure, you need to oxidize the water, or shock the spa. Non-chlorine shock has no odor, and does not affect water chemistry. You can use the spa immediately after treating the water.

My recommendation is to use a few tablespoons of non-chlorine shock after every spa use, or at least weekly to control and destroy any pathogenic microbes that are able to get around the ozone and mineral treatment.  Also known as MPS, Zodiac Cense is a great product that will oxidize quickly and also adds a nice scent to the water.

Keep your Spa Water Balanced

This is important no matter what your spa sanitation method is, but especially when you are operating a chlorine free spa or hot tub. Maintain your pH level at 7.2-7.5, your Alkalinity at 80-120 and your Hardness at 180-220. Use fresh test strips or fresh reagents and test your spa water at least twice per week, adding water balance chemicals as needed.

Shower before using the Spa

please-showerI know some people (ok, I’ve done it too) who treat their hot tub like a big bathtub. After working in the yard all day, or dancing all night – they jump in the spa to “clean off”. Well, when you bring perspiration, body oils, make up, or if you’ve gone to the bathroom (#2), without washing yourself, this creates a large sanitizer demand in the water.

I’m not saying you must always shower before using the spa, but if you don’t – be sure to give it a good shocking afterwards with MPS.

It can be awkward to ask your friends to shower before coming over, so using an Enzyme product can help break down oils and organics and retain healthy spa water that all can enjoy.

And that’s it! You can successfully operate a healthy spa or hot tub without using chlorine and bromine, if you follow these steps above.

 

- Jack

 

 

5 Important Spa or Hot Tub Care Tasks

July 15th, 2013 by

spa-hot-tub-care

Owning a spa or hot tub is not so complicated. Compared to a swimming pool, there’s a lot less work involved. But there is some work required, and maybe your spa has been a bit neglected lately, as sometimes happens during summertime.

Depending on your level of spa use, the frequency of these tasks will vary. Following each task below, follow a task frequency, mirroring your hot tub usage.

 

  • High – Daily use by several people; or commercial spas and hot tubs
  • Medium – A few times per week, by a few people.
  • Low – A few times per month, by a few people.

1. Spa Water Care

spa-water-testsTesting the Spa water, balancing the chemistry and visually checking the water clarity. Pretty basic stuff? Yeah, easy to do – and easy to forget to do. Most spas and hot tubs have something of a “chemical personality”, and are usually fairly consistent in what needs to be chemically managed – as long as you are consistent with your water tests and adjustments.

Not even a “spa guru” like myself can avoid the sometimes mundane task of testing the spa water quality and making micro-adjustments to the water balance. pH, Alkalinity, Hardness all need to be checked every time the spa is used. Neglect this task, and your spa water clarity and health can quickly spiral downward.

Draining the spa should be performed on a regular basis, every 1-4 months, depending on your usage, or even weekly, for high use commercial spas. You’ll find the water much more manageable if you set a schedule to drain it regularly.

2. Spa Filter Care

spa-filter-cartsNext up on our list of Hot Tub maintenance items – cleaning your spa filter cartridge. This task is simple enough for my 8 year old to do, once I showed her how to remove the spa filter and spray deeply into the pleats from top to bottom. It’s one of her weekend chores, and only takes a few minutes with the garden hose.

To help us remember, I created an email reminder to myself to make sure it’s done weekly, and another every 4 months, to soak the filter in our Filter Fresh spa cartridge cleaner for a deep cleaning.

Spa filter cleaners remove oils and mineral deposits that clog up the cartridge, reducing water flow and dirt holding capacity. Just soak the cartridge in a solution of filter cartridge cleaner, or use the spray on type of cleaner. Then, hose it off very thoroughly to flush out the deposits and the cleaning chemical.

Over time, even this loses it’s effectiveness, and it’s time to replace the cartridge. If everything is going well with the spa water, I buy a spa filter replacement every 18 months. High use hot tubs may need to replace the cartridge every 3 months, depending on the size of the filter cartridge.

3. Spa Pipe Care

spa-biofilmI’m not talking about leaks, although you should inspect for leaks in your spa, and promptly repair any that occur. I’m talking about bacteria deposits, sometimes called Bio-Film, that can develop and grow inside the pipes, hoses and jets of your spa.

Using a product like Tub Rinse, add it to the spa before you plan to drain the spa. High use spas should use this every time the hot tub is drained. This will reduce the amount of organics in the spa, which allows the sanitizer to work more effectively, and keep your spa water looking clear, even after heavy use. For my medium-use spa, I use it every other time I drain the hot tub.

Just pour it in and allow it to circulate for an hour – before you drain the spa. The first time you use it, you’ll be shocked at all of the nasty brown gunk that it removes and foams to the surface. It would be similar to a person who finally brushes their teeth after months of only using mouthwash. Yuck!

4. Spa Equipment Care

spa-equipmentYour spa pack is the main control center for your spa or hot tub, and includes your spa heater. To care for your equipment, remove the access panel at least monthly to inspect for leaks, the presence of rodents, rust or corrosion. Use bug spray or mice baits if you notice evidence of either. Check your time clock and reset it if there has been a power outage.

Electric terminals can be coated with a dielectric grease (shut off power first) to keep oxidation from forming. If there is nothing out of the ordinary spotted, this job will go quickly.

If something looks amiss with your spa equipment, and you’re not quite sure which steps to take, give us a call for some spa troubleshooting help.

5. Spa Cover Care

spa-cover-care-tipsSpa covers need to “breathe”, and should be removed from the spa several times per week, to allow the spa to gas off – any accumulated odors and gases. It also gives the spa cover a break from the hot water and chemicals. Remove the spa cover completely, and store it folded and upright, to allow any water to drain out.

Inspect the underside of your spa cover for any rips in the plastic, cracks in the insulative foam, warping or water retention. If any of these has occurred, you should plan on replacing with a new spa cover soon.

Cleaning and conditioning the vinyl of your spa cover will keep it looking new and it can often double the lifespan of your spa cover. My spa cover gets a quarterly “spa treatment” – I use the 303 spa cover cleaner and conditioner wipes. It only takes me about 10 minutes to clean and protect the spa cover. This shines it up real nicely, blocks UV rays and helps keep it clean, but the best advantage is that it keeps the vinyl supple and soft.

Ignore this spa task, and your spa cover material will start to shrink, shrivel and eventually it will crack and become threadbare.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works

 

Deep Cleaning your Spa or Hot Tub

May 10th, 2013 by

Deep Cleaning your Spa or Hot TubYour Spa or Hot Tub is wonderful for restful relaxation or romantic evenings – but there is a dark side. Maintenance and Care.

Just like owning a car, there are specific and regular treatments needed to keep it running and looking good. Unlike my car however, my spa is easy to clean, maintain and service.

Here’s the what I do to really deep clean my hot tub, which I do every 3 months – or sooner, if I’m planning a big hot tub party, or we’ve had a “high-use weekend”.

 

Clean the Pipes

If your spa is like mine, it has dozens of jets and hundreds of feet of hidden pipes and hoses. Scientists discovered that BioFilm bacteria can find harbor inside the plumbing and equipment of hot water tubs. Just like carbon build-up in your car, it’s best to remove these deposits regularly to keep the spa sanitary. I use a product called Jet Clean the night before I plan to drain the hot tub. As it circulates, it breaks down scale and biofilm, so that I can flush it out with my next day draining.

Clean the Filter

After I have circulated the Jet Clean, I remove the filter cartridges and spray in between the pleats with my garden hose. Then, I drop it in a bucket of Spa Filter Clean solution and let is soak overnight. In the morning, as I’m draining the spa, the spa filter gets another cleaning with the garden hose (until it stops foaming), and I set it in the sun to dry. Drying your spa cartridges, before re-installing, helps kill any remaining bacteria, and lets the fibers open up and “breathe” just slightly.

Drain the Spa

First, shut off the power to the spa, in preparation for draining. Most spas have a water valve underneath, where a garden hose is connected. If not, a small submersible pump can be used. As it’s draining, I move the garden hose around my yard to recycle the water. When it’s half empty, I use another garden hose with a spray nozzle to spray into the jets and skimmer. If you notice any algae or slimy discoloration, remove the jet eyeballs and drain covers, and soak them in a chlorine solution. Use a bottle brush to scrub inside the pipes, and hose out again with fresh water.

Clean the Shell

My spa is an acrylic shell, with a beautiful shiny silver finish. To clean the inside of the shell, I spray on CitraBright and wipe it down with a soft cloth. Even though the spa shell looks clean, I’m always amazed at the amount of dirt on the cloth. It’s important to not use any household cleaners or other products that could contain harmful chemicals or phosphates. You don’t want that stuff in your spa water. Citrabright cleans fast with no residue, and has a nice Orange County scent.

Protect the Shell

Fast Gloss seals and protects the shell of the spa from sunlight and spa chemicals. What I really like about it, and why I use it, is that it makes my spa shine like it’s brand new! It also removes any streaking left over from the cleaning process. Just wipe it on, and buff a bit – real easy. It also lasts a long time, I think I’ve had my bottle for over 2 years now. After this treatment, I begin to fill the spa. Mine takes about 3-4 hours to fill, so I might have to delay filling, or adjust my schedule so I don’t overflow the spa (again)!

Clean the Spa Cover

I can’t work for a Hot Tub cover company and have a ratty looking spa top! My spa cover is 4 years old, but it still looks great. I use our hot tub Cover Care and Conditioner every 3 months. This is a combination cleaner and conditioner, in one step – just wipe it on, and wipe it off. I also use it on the spa pillows.

Clean Underneath

My spa equipment sits underneath the spa. It’s a nice warm place for small critters to hide, and maybe damage something, so keep this area of your spa clean too. I normally use my long extension on my vacuum cleaner, and suck up any cobwebs or debris. Occasionally, I spray it with a hose, but I’m careful about the electronics. If you find any evidence of rodents, you can use poison bait, or try Mouse-Away, which repels them with a cute mint sachet.

And that’s it! That’s how I do it anyway. Every 3 months, just like changing the oil in your car – give your spa a deep clean, and it can look like new – nearly forever!

XOXO;

Gina Galvin
Hot Tub Works

Signs That You Need a New Spa Filter Cartridge

April 4th, 2013 by

spa-filter-cartridges

 

At Hot Tub Works, we spend a lot of time thinking about spa filter cartridges – maybe too much time! They are one of our largest selling product lines, and a topic that our customers bring up quite a bit.

The question is “How do you know when to replace the spa filter?” Aside from indications of total failure, such as rips in the fabric or a cracked end cap – how can you determine when the filtering ability has diminished?

 

 

How Long Do Spa Filters Last?

I wish that they cartridges would change color or something, so that spa owners know – that their filter has reached it’s “half-life”. Fact is, each time you clean the cartridge, the fabric fibers are stretched apart a little bit more, which reduces dirt trapping ability.

By the time you have cleaned your cartridge a dozen times, it can be allowing twice the volume of matter to slip through the material, passing right through your hot tub filter. So, one way to determine when to replace is to set a schedule for cleanings, and when you reach 10-15 cleanings, it’s time to replace the cartridge.

Many of our customers have a schedule where they simply replace the cartridge on an annual basis, at the same time each year.

How Often do You Clean It?

Another way to easily tell when the spa filter has reached it’s half-life, is when the time interval between cleanings increases. If you were formerly able to maintain water clarity or proper filter pressure with a monthly cleaning, but now it has to be done every two weeks, you can assume that your filter cartridge is clogged with minerals or oils.

Spa filter cleaners can help remove this gunk, or it may be time to just replace the hot tub filter(s).

Spa Water Clarity

A third way to measure your cartridge effectiveness is to look at your spa water. Is it as clear and sparkly as you want, or does it look dull and dirty?

You may find yourself compensating for a weak spa filter by using more sanitizer than you used to use, or having to run the spa filter longer – in order to achieve the same degree of water clarity in your spa.

Spa Filter Tips

To help your spa or hot tub filters last longer, follow these tips:

spa-filter

  1. Always have a spare spa filter to use while cleaning and drying the dirty spa filter
  2. Drying after cleaning helps kill any remaining bacteria and contaminants
  3. Use a spa filter cleaner every 3-6 months, to remove oils and mineral deposits
  4. Don’t use a brush while cleaning, and don’t use a pressure washer
  5. Don’t use any household chemicals, soaps or detergents

To keep your spa sparkling and safe to use, replace your spa filter cartridges every 12-24 months. With our low prices, at up to 50% off retail – there’s no excuse not to buy new filter cartridges for your spa or hot tub!

- Jack

Hot Tub Infographic

November 14th, 2012 by

Hot Tub infographics are all the rage now. This is one of the best, made from our friend Matt at SwimUniversity. It covers spa water care, spa filter care, spa water replacement, spa cover care, and finally cabinet and shell care. A full guide to spa and hot tub care. Print it out or pin/post to share the page with your friends!

A Complete Guide to Hot Tub Care by Swim University

hotTubCareInfographic

 

Spa Filters That Perform

August 15th, 2012 by

hot-tub-filter-cartridges

At Hot Tub Works, we offer the highest quality hot tub filters made, with the best media available; Reemay, a spun polyester. Below if some research conducted by our filter manufacturer to illustrate how our filters out perform the competition.

 

 

One of our competitors has recently introduced a new filtration fabric. They claim that this new fabric is so effective, nothing cleans better or faster. They even go so far as to sell you a 3-ounce filter for pools, when systems using 4-ounce filter fabric are the only ones that pass NSF Standard 50. What’s more, the use of 4-ounce filters is universally supported by pool OEMs.

We don’t think a substandard filter is good for you or your spa.

Think all cartridges are alike? Think again. Without seams that can crack and collapse, FILBUR one-piece, punched PVC cores are stronger than the molded ones found on competitor cartridges. Not only that: Our end caps offer integrated fittings for easy installation and removal, eliminating the need for PAD adapters.

 

 

Reemay is Heavier.
Reemay’s 28% greater weight means more fibers per area to capture more dirt.

Reemay is Thicker.
At 62% thicker, Reemay offers more fibers to collect dirt. Greater thickness means greater dirt-holding capacity and much less chance for dirt to escape the fabric.

Reemay is Sturdier.
135% stiffer means greater pleat integrity, less chance of puncture and tearing for longer life.

 

Substandard filter fabric means a substandard filter cartridge. One that can plug more quickly, require frequent cleaning, deliver inferior water clarity and need replacement more often. In the long run, this costs consumers more, risking your business. Reemay holds 59% more dirt before clogging.

At Hot Tub Works, we stock over 10,000 spa filters for every make and model that has ever made.  If you need a quality spa filter at a great price with free shipping, you can find them here: Spa Filters.

 

Sundance Spa Filters 2000-2005

August 9th, 2011 by

sundance-spa-covers

This is a Sundance Spa Filters Matrix for years 2000-2005.

If you click the HTF-xxxx at the top of the chart it will take you to the  right filter.

Or  you can a see a full list of all Sundance Spa Filters click here: Sundance Spa Filters

 

Filter Matrix Sundance (2000-2005)
Spa Year Spa Model (1) HTF-2386    (1) HTF-2387 HTF-2760 HTF-2770 HTF-2780 HTF-2790 HTF-6540-507 HTF-2811 HTF-2810 w/ HTF-6540-502
2000-2001 Altamar
2002-2005
2000-2002 Aruba
2000-2002 Bahia
2003-2005
2000-2002 Bali
2000-2001 Cameo
2002-2004
2005
2000-2001 Capri 2001 2000
2002-2005
2000-2001 Caprio/ Caprio ST
2002-2005
2003-2005 Cayman
2000-2002 Cyprus
2003-2005 Hermosa
2003-2005 Legunas
2005 Majesta
2000-2001 Marin
2002-2005
2000-2001 Maxxus
2002-2004
2005
2004-2005 Metro
2000-2001 Optima
2002-2004
2005
2000-2002 Palermo
2003-2005
2003-2005 *Redondo
1997-2005 Solo
2000-2001 Tango
2002-2003

* Redondo spas built before June 1, 2003 use the 6540-720 Filter cartridge with 6540-719 skimmer assembly

Sundance Filter Matrix 1990-1999

July 28th, 2011 by

sundance-spa-logo-140

Spa
Year
Spa Model (1) HTF-2386 (1) HTF-2387 HTF-2390 HTF-2730 HTF-2740 HTF-0161 HTF-2790 HTF-2710 HTF-1630
All Allergo
1998-1999 Altamar
1998-1999 Aspen
1998-1999 Autin
1990-1991 Cabaret
1990-1994 Calypso 1993-1994 Mid 1990 1990-92
1995-1999 Calypso I / and II
1991-1994 Cameo
1995-1999
1990 Cameo Jr.
1990 Cameo Jr. Jamb.
1990 Cameo SE
1993-1999 Capri 1993-1994 1995-1999
1998 Cheyenne
1995-1997 Corum
1990-1991 Gemini 1990 1991
1998-1999 Hartford
All Liberty
1990-1991 Los Cabos 1990 1991
1998-1999 Madison
1990-1991 Mardi Gras 1990 1991
1990-1999 Marin 1990 1993-1994 1995-1999 1991-1992
1990-1999 Maxxus 1991-1994 1995-1999
1991 Montego Mid Year
1993 Mid 1993
1993-1999 1993-1996 1997-1999
1998-1999 Olympia
1995-1999 Optima
1991 Rio Mid 1991
1992-1994 1992-1994 Mid 1992
1995-1999
1987-1997 Royal 1990 1991-199 1995-1997
1994 Suntub
1995-4/98
1990-1991 Supra Lounger 1990 1991
1991-1999 Tango Mid 1991 1991-99
1998-1999 Telluride
1998-1999 Vail

 

Click here for all hot tub filters or spa filters.

 

 

Sundance Spas Filters 2006-Current

July 26th, 2011 by

sundance-spa-logo-140

Spa Year Spa Model HTF-0315 HTF-2390 HTF-2385 HTF-2770 HTF-6540-507 HTF-2780 HTF-6541-397 HTF-2810 w/ HTF-6540-502
2006 Altamar
2007-2008
2009+
2006 Bahia
2006-2007 Burlington
2008+
2006 Cameo
2007-2008
2009+
2006 Capri
2007-2008
2009+
2006 Caprio/ Caprio ST
2006 Cayman
2007+ Camden
2007+ Certa
2007+ Chelsee
2006+ Denali
2008+ Dover
2007+ Hamilton
2007+ Hartford
2007+ Hawthorne
2006 Majesta
2007-2008
2009+
2006 Marin
2007-2008
2009+
2006 Maxxus
2007-2008
2009+
2006-2007 Metro
2006 Optima
2007-2008
2009+
2006 Palermo
2006-2007 Solo
2006+ Tacoma