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Archive for the ‘spa covers’ Category

Measuring for a new Spa Cover

May 23rd, 2013 by

measure-spa-coverThe easiest way to order a new spa cover is to order by make and model from our database of over 100 different spa manufacturers and over 1000 different models. But, when your not sure, or want to make sure you get the best fitting spa cover, the best thing is to measure your existing hot tub cover.

In just a few steps, and with just a tape measure and our order form, I’ll show you how to order a perfect spa cover every time.

 

The most common question we get is “What should I measure?” If your current hot tub cover is in pretty good shape, you can just measure the existing cover. If it’s in really bad shape, then you’ll measure the tub instead.

The most important thing is that your measurements be from outside acrylic to outside acrylic. Don’t measure to the outside of the spa cabinet, but just to the point where the spa shell ends.

The most common shaped hot tub is a square or a rectangle, that’s about 85% of hot tubs. If you have a hot tub made after 1985, chances are it has rounded corners. The most common hot tub covers we make are rounded square, or rounded rectangle. If you have a different shaped hot tub, don’t worry, these principles will apply as well. spa-cover-measurement-form

The first thing to make note of is where the fold is, or which direction the fold of your spa cover is running. On our measuring form, you’ll notice that the “A” measurement is always cut in half by the fold of the spa cover. So the first measurement of a spa cover is straight across the cover, and across the fold. Write down this first measurement down.

The next measure is the “B” measurement, taken across the cover, perpendicular to the first measurement. Write down this measurement.

C” is the third measurement that we take is to determine the radius, or the curvature of the rounded corner. There are two ways to measure this, with a carpenter’s square, or with a measuring tape. The measure is taken from where the curve begins to the point where it intersects at a 90 degree angle, with a straight edge, or yard stick held on the adjacent edge of the cover, as shown in the image above.

The curve could be very slight, a 4″ radius, or they can be 12″ in some cases. It’s important to carefully measure the corner radius, to have the best fitting spa cover.

 

Spa skirt measuring

Next, we’ll measure the length of the spa cover skirt and the straps. On our website, we have default values – for the most common measurements, but you can enter your own. The skirt should hang down long enough to cover the acrylic on the spa, to protect it from the UV rays. Measure the length of your current spa cover skirt, from the bottom of the cover to the edge of the skirt. Shown in this image, we have a 5″ spa cover skirt length.

 

spa-cover-safety-straps

Now you can measure the safety strap, in the same manner, from the bottom of the spa cover, and including the skirt, to the buckle – but not including the buckle. Our new spa covers include 2 safety straps, with standard buckles to fit your existing strap locks. We also include the complete hardware kit if you want to change the entire lock. Write down the measurement of your spa straps. Shown in this image, we have an 8″ safety strap length.

 

And that’s it! Just 5 pieces of information necessary to order a replacement spa cover from Hottubworks. You can always order by make and model, but if that information isn’t handy, you can measure your own hot tub in just a few minutes.

Here’s Jerry from Hot Tub Works, in a video about how to measure your current spa cover for a replacement cover

- Jack

Deep Cleaning your Spa or Hot Tub

May 10th, 2013 by

Deep Cleaning your Spa or Hot TubYour Spa or Hot Tub is wonderful for restful relaxation or romantic evenings – but there is a dark side. Maintenance and Care.

Just like owning a car, there are specific and regular treatments needed to keep it running and looking good. Unlike my car however, my spa is easy to clean, maintain and service.

Here’s the what I do to really deep clean my hot tub, which I do every 3 months – or sooner, if I’m planning a big hot tub party, or we’ve had a “high-use weekend”.

 

Clean the Pipes

If your spa is like mine, it has dozens of jets and hundreds of feet of hidden pipes and hoses. Scientists discovered that BioFilm bacteria can find harbor inside the plumbing and equipment of hot water tubs. Just like carbon build-up in your car, it’s best to remove these deposits regularly to keep the spa sanitary. I use a product called Jet Clean the night before I plan to drain the hot tub. As it circulates, it breaks down scale and biofilm, so that I can flush it out with my next day draining.

Clean the Filter

After I have circulated the Jet Clean, I remove the filter cartridges and spray in between the pleats with my garden hose. Then, I drop it in a bucket of Spa Filter Clean solution and let is soak overnight. In the morning, as I’m draining the spa, the spa filter gets another cleaning with the garden hose (until it stops foaming), and I set it in the sun to dry. Drying your spa cartridges, before re-installing, helps kill any remaining bacteria, and lets the fibers open up and “breathe” just slightly.

Drain the Spa

First, shut off the power to the spa, in preparation for draining. Most spas have a water valve underneath, where a garden hose is connected. If not, a small submersible pump can be used. As it’s draining, I move the garden hose around my yard to recycle the water. When it’s half empty, I use another garden hose with a spray nozzle to spray into the jets and skimmer. If you notice any algae or slimy discoloration, remove the jet eyeballs and drain covers, and soak them in a chlorine solution. Use a bottle brush to scrub inside the pipes, and hose out again with fresh water.

Clean the Shell

My spa is an acrylic shell, with a beautiful shiny silver finish. To clean the inside of the shell, I spray on CitraBright and wipe it down with a soft cloth. Even though the spa shell looks clean, I’m always amazed at the amount of dirt on the cloth. It’s important to not use any household cleaners or other products that could contain harmful chemicals or phosphates. You don’t want that stuff in your spa water. Citrabright cleans fast with no residue, and has a nice Orange County scent.

Protect the Shell

Fast Gloss seals and protects the shell of the spa from sunlight and spa chemicals. What I really like about it, and why I use it, is that it makes my spa shine like it’s brand new! It also removes any streaking left over from the cleaning process. Just wipe it on, and buff a bit – real easy. It also lasts a long time, I think I’ve had my bottle for over 2 years now. After this treatment, I begin to fill the spa. Mine takes about 3-4 hours to fill, so I might have to delay filling, or adjust my schedule so I don’t overflow the spa (again)!

Clean the Spa Cover

I can’t work for a Hot Tub cover company and have a ratty looking spa top! My spa cover is 4 years old, but it still looks great. I use our hot tub Cover Care and Conditioner every 3 months. This is a combination cleaner and conditioner, in one step – just wipe it on, and wipe it off. I also use it on the spa pillows.

Clean Underneath

My spa equipment sits underneath the spa. It’s a nice warm place for small critters to hide, and maybe damage something, so keep this area of your spa clean too. I normally use my long extension on my vacuum cleaner, and suck up any cobwebs or debris. Occasionally, I spray it with a hose, but I’m careful about the electronics. If you find any evidence of rodents, you can use poison bait, or try Mouse-Away, which repels them with a cute mint sachet.

And that’s it! That’s how I do it anyway. Every 3 months, just like changing the oil in your car – give your spa a deep clean, and it can look like new – nearly forever!

XOXO;

Gina Galvin
Hot Tub Works

How to Buy a Spa Cover

May 2nd, 2013 by

how-to-buy-a-spa-cover

Spa covers last for many years, but eventually – they become broken or water logged. Replacing a spa cover, or buying your first cover, can be a simple, fast and inexpensive purchase ~ if you know what to look for.

In this post, I’ll tell you how to quickly find your exact fit hot tub cover online, and how to decide on the many features and options – so you can compare spa covers from many dealers, and find the best price on the best fitting spa cover that best fits your needs.

Discover Your Spa Cover

Spa Cover Make & Model

Spa Cover Make and Model

Every spa or hot tub has a make and model, just like an automobile. “Make” refers to the manufacturer of the spa, and “Model” is the name of the spa. Most online spa cover stores will allow you to choose your Make, and then provide a list of Models made by the manufacturer.

This is by far the easiest way to order a spa cover. If you don’t see the Make and Model listed on the outside of the tub, open the service panel to look inside for a placard or sticker. Or, if you have the original spa invoice or owner’s manual or a brochure, this should also give you the information needed.

 

Spa Cover Shape & Dimensions

spa-cover-shapes-sizes-2

It happens that many folks can’t find the Make & Model of spa, so you’ll find that most hot tub cover sites will allow you to order a spa cover by choosing the shape of the spa cover and then filling in some simple dimensions.

Our website asks you to pick from 11 common spa cover shapes, and also has an option for “Unusual or Oversized” cover shapes, which are used more for freeform inground spas, than for portable hot tubs.

After you pick the shape of spa cover that you have, you will be asked to take 2-4 measurements – of the spa shell, not of the existing spa cover, but the outside to outside measurement of the spa shell.

We’ll also ask for the measurement of the existing spa cover skirt length and strap length. The skirt is the material that hangs down to help seal up the spa. Most skirt lengths are about 4″, but you can specify, from 2 – 6 inches. The spa straps are sewn onto the skirt, and these have clips that attach into buckles attached to the spa sides. 7 inches is standard, but you can specify longer or shorter spa straps.

 

Spa Covers Features & Options

So that you can compare Apples to Apples, you’ll want to understand the various features of better spa covers. Some of these may be included “standard” on your spa cover, or may be an optional expense.

Spa Cover Colors

A color choice is standard with all hot tub cover dealers. You should have at least 8 colors to choose from; at Hottubworks, we have 14 colors available, from Almond to Walnut. Choose a color that complements your patio decor, or your particular taste.

spa-cover-color-choices

Foam Density & Thickness

Inside of your marine grade vinyl spa cover are rigid foam panels, which taper to a smaller thickness near the outside of the cover, to allow water to run off easily. The thickness of the foam panels will affect it’s strength and it’s heat retention ability. Thicker spa covers are stronger and keep more heat in the spa, but they’re also a heavier when moving. We have 3 thickness available – 4 inch tapering to 2 inches on the side, or a 5 inch tapering to 3″, or our thickest, a 6″ foam panel, tapering to 4″ inches.

Foam Density is another selection to make. Denser foams hor heat retention, and can resist damage more easily. Denser foam panels also resist water absorption better than a foam with more air pockets. We also have 3 Densities available – 1 lb. foam, 1.5 lb. foam and our 2 lb. foam density.

Hottubworks always use virgin foam core stock, made without any ozone depleting CFC’s or HCFC’s

Spa Cover R-Value

The R-Value of a spa cover is a measure of it’s thermal resistance. You’ve seen R-value on other products as well, such as windows, wall materials and home insulation. Essentially, the R-Value of a spa cover is it’s resistance to heat loss. I like to also call it the “Retention Value”, for how much heat a spa cover will Retain.

The R-Value for hot tub covers is influenced by 3 things – the Foam Density and the Foam Thickness, discussed above, and the Continuous Heat Seal, discussed below. Here’s a chart I made containing R-Values for spa covers, from 12 – 30, depending on the foam thickness and density.

spa-cover-r-value-char-t-2

Continuous Heat Seal

Every spa cover has a fold, and some larger spa covers can have more than one. At this junction of the two foam panels is a weak spot for heat retention. Most spa covers use two pads at each end of the fold, to keep heat from escaping, but this leaves a large gap through the rest of the fold. A Continuous Heat Seal keeps heat from escaping through the hinge, or fold of the spa cover. It’s a dense pad that runs the entire length of the hinge, sewn in place, and it really improves heat retention, especially in colder climates.

Double Wrapped Foam Core

double wrapped foam core

The foam core on spa covers is wrapped in a thick plastic to prevent moisture from working it’s way into the foam. If you’ve ever struggled with a soggy, water logged spa cover, you know how important this plastic cover can be. Having a Double-Wrapped foam core simply means that the core is wrapped twice, for more moisture and vapor resistance and protection from accident prone people who may nick, burn or tear the plastic.

Spa Cover Dealers

Finally, to make the best comparison of hot tub covers, consider the expertise and reputation of the company that you are buying a spa cover from. There are many ways to make cheaper spa covers, simply by using cheaper materials, weaker construction and lax quality control. Using cut-rate shippers is another way that some spa cover dealers shave a few bucks off their cover cost.

Hottubworks uses computer aided design and manufacturing processes, top grade materials and quality construction. All covers go through a 16 point quality inspection and are shipped with national carriers that you know and trust.

Here’s Drake, from Hottubworks, with some video tips for you on How to Buy a Hot Tub Cover. You can see more spa cover videos on our YouTube Channel.

Securing Your Spa or Hot Tub Cover for Safety

April 9th, 2013 by

spa cover-straps - regular type

It was a dark and stormy night. Wind swept up the valley, and pounded our neighborhood the entire night. We had trees down across the street, and to our surprise, our spa cover had taken flight across the backyard.

The spa cover was unfortunately damaged beyond repair, both foam panels were cracked. When I told my story to Jerry, one of the owners here at Hot Tub Works; he laughed, and told me to use Hurricane Straps, and then he handed me a free pair! (He was happy that he was going to sell me a new spa cover!) :-)

 

Standard Spa Cover Straps

Spa cover straps like those pictured above, are sewn onto the edge of most all of our spa covers. These standard straps are pretty sturdy during light winds, provide a small amount of security, and may prevent young children (or adults) from using the spa without supervision. But they really aren’t super-strong, and the spa cover clips or even the straps can break in high winds.

Spa Cover Wind Straps

spa-cover-wind-straps

You may call these Hurricane Straps, like Jerry did, but they are listed on our site as Spa Cover Wind Straps. Whatever you call them, these 1″ nylon webbing straps with thick foam edge pads to prevent rubbing, are the sure way to hold down your spa cover in a wind storm.

They are also considerably more difficult to remove than regular straps sewn onto the spa cover, to keep small children safe around the spa. And although I’m not sure, these straps will probably prevent bears or other large wildlife from removing the hot tub cover.

For added security, these straps have heavy-duty, quick-connect Sure-Loc Fasteners that clip together easily and securely. The trick to removal is to push down slightly on the spa cover, to give some slack to the strap. Then squeeze both sides of the clip to release the latch.

Inground Spa Cover Straps

inground-spa needs a spa coverWhat if you have an inground spa, with a spa cover that just sits over the edge? On an inground spa there is no skirt around the spa for which to fasten the strap clips. How can you secure a spa cover onto an inground spa?

What you can do is install brass safety cover anchors, which are made for pool safety covers. Drill 4 or 6 anchors into the deck around the inground spa, and use the safety cover springs to connect the straps to the anchors.

To create this arrangement, you’ll need several yards of of nylon webbing from your local fabric store. These hardware to make wind straps for inground spa coversstraps will cross over top of your cover, so you’ll need the diameter of your spa cover, plus about 5 feet for each strap. If your inground spa is raised up off the deck surface, you’ll need extra length to reach the pool deck.

Then, order pool safety cover hardware – stainless steel springs, SS buckles and brass anchors – 2 for each strap that you want to make. You can find them online at pool supply sites, search for mesh pool cover parts.

You’ll need a hammer drill to install the anchors into the deck surrounding the inground spa. You also may want to purchase the spring removal tool, which makes it much easier to attach and remove the spring from the anchor.

Keeping your spa cover secured is important in high wind areas – and also important to prevent accidental drowning in spas or hot tubs. Remember to use your strap clips, and keep your spa covered tightly when not in use!

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

 

 

Hot Tub Cover Care and Maintenance

March 18th, 2013 by

Before and After using Leisure Time Spa Cover CleanerYour spa or hot tub cover fights the weather all year long, and like any Marine grade vinyl, cleaning and conditioning will make it last much longer.

Sun, rain and snow pull out the resins that keep vinyl soft and pliable. Over time, spa covers that are not cleaned and protected become brittle, and soon develop thin spots, rips and tears.

Fortunately, maintaining your hot tub cover is easy. I clean my cover once every few months, and it looks as good as the day I bought it (from HotTubWorks, of course), 3 yrs ago.

 

How to Clean a Hot Tub Cover

Start with a dry spa cover (use a towel if it’s been raining). Although you can use other vinyl cleaner and conditioner products, we have two products that are specifically meant for use with spa covers.

Just wipe it on the surface, and use a soft cloth to remove any excess. Apply more on seams or low spots that puddle water. It’s quick and easy to apply to both the top and the sides – but don’t use it on the inside of the spa cover.

Hot Tub Cover Cleaners303-spa-cover-wipes

303 Spa Cover Wipes – These are even easier. Pre-moistened towelettes meant for one time use. Wipe it on the surface of your spa cover for an instant shine and cleaning. This is the product I have at home for my hot tub cover.

Leisure Time Cover Care - Cleans, restores and protects spa covers. Apply it with a sponge, using the textured side if you need it to remove tough stains. Allows you to apply extra if needed, unlike the wipes.

How to Condition a Hot Tub Cover

After a cleaning of your spa cover, your vinyl is prepped to receive a protectant. Without first cleaning the spa cover, the absorption of the protectant is limited, and protection is reduced. And, if after cleaning your spa cover, a protectant is not used, you may be amazed at how fast your spa cover gets dirty again. This is because cleaning your spa cover “opens up the pores” of the vinyl (much like skin), and dirt can gain a quick foothold – if not sealed up again with a bit of vinyl protection.

Hot Tub Cover Conditionersspa-cover-conditioner

Spa Cover Conditioner – This is our own brand, and our most economical spa cover protectant. Squeeze it out onto a sponge and the cream soaks into the vinyl cover. High level of UV protection – it’s like sunscreen for your spa cover!

303 Vinyl Protectant – Not oily or greasy, like other spa cover protectants. Spray on, wipe off. Repels dirt and dust and stains from leaves or animals.

How to Clean the Underside of your Spa Cover

Normally, the underside of your spa cover should not need cleaning, but if you notice a moldy, musty smell, or see dirt or discoloration on the surface, here’s a trick from an old hot tubber. Fill a small spray bottle with a 10:1 solution of water:bleach, or a 10% solution of bleach. Do this after removing the spa cover from the spa. After spraying the plastic undersides, hose clean with fresh water.

Don’t use household cleaning chemicals on your spa cover – you may add phosphates or detergents to the spa which can contaminate the water and give you problems with algae, foaming – or both. Some cleansers can even be harmful to spa users, if it gets into the spa water.

Hot Tub Cover Maintenance

Other than cleaning and conditioning your hot tub cover every 3 months or so, there isn’t usually any maintenance or needed repairs (as long as you are using a spa cover lifter). Here’s a few tips if you have problems with your spa top.

  1. Small tears to the plastic lining under the cover should be taped or patched to keep moisture out.
  2. Spa cover handles or straps can be sewn on again with an awl, or stapled (use Stainless Steel staples).
  3. Tears or rips in your vinyl cover material can be patched with an automotive “liquid vinyl” kit.
  4. Using a Spa Cover Cap can add years of life to your spa cover, and reduce the need for cleaning.

 

- Jack

 

Hot Tub Infographic

November 14th, 2012 by

Hot Tub infographics are all the rage now. This is one of the best, made from our friend Matt at SwimUniversity. It covers spa water care, spa filter care, spa water replacement, spa cover care, and finally cabinet and shell care. A full guide to spa and hot tub care. Print it out or pin/post to share the page with your friends!

A Complete Guide to Hot Tub Care by Swim University

hotTubCareInfographic

 

Hot Tub or Hot Tug?

October 2nd, 2012 by

I came across a CNET article about these fun hot tubs made in the Netherlands. You gotta love these folks that are making hot tubs go where they have never gone before.

hot-tugs spa boats

What is a HotTug? A wood-fired hot tub in which you can sail and a tugboat in which you can enjoy warm baths. With or without water the HotTug is a wide and stable boat for up to six people.

In the HotTug you can always enjoy yourself … whatever the weather is. Relax steaming through the canal, harbor or a lake? You’re able to with the HotTug!

This floating, boating hot tub is constructed from wood, coated with fiberglass. The HotTug has a stainless steel stove with a single wall pipe. The HotTug is available in two versions: 1 with integrated electric motor of 2.4 KW 2 with outboard.

How is the water in the HotTug heated?
A wood stove heats the water.

How long does it fill up with water and how long does it take to heat the water?
The filling rate depends on the thickness of the hose and the pressure. The HotTug can contain 2000 liters. The heater heats the water about eight degrees per hour. On average, it takes 3 hours before the water is 38 degrees Celsius. (or 100° in Fahrenheit).

How do you empty the HotTug?
The easiest way is with a submersible pump. With a small pump the HotTug is emptied in twenty minutes.

How hot is the water?
As warm as you want, but average people find a comfortable temperature of 38 degrees Celsius and that is no problem for the HotTug heater.

How many people are able to sit in the HotTug?
Six to eight people can sit in the HotTug.

How does the HotTug sail?
The HotTug is available in two versions:
1 with integrated electric motor of 2.4 KW
2 with outboard engine (electric or petrol)

How long do the batteries last?
The batteries will last at least 600 cycles. If they are not fully discharged, they last longer. On average you need to replace the batteries every seven years.

How much maintenance does the HotTug need?
Depending on the surrounding water (salt / freshwater / brackish), it is wise to apply a layer of antifouling every year or every two years. You need to empty the heater every season.

Where is the HotTug for sale?
At this moment the HotTug exclusively at supergoed.nl

Is the HotTug available in other colors?
By default, the HotTug is black, but at extra cost, any RAL and NCS colors are possible.

Where can I see the HotTug?
In cooperation with the Storm Water Sports, the HotTug is introduced at ‘in water boat show’ / Hiswa 2012. In addition you can see the HotTug at supergoed by appointment.

Does It Need A Hot Tub Cover?

Yes, but they don’t make them, but HotTubWorks.com does, so you are in luck!

 

Hot Tub Covers and Bears

September 17th, 2012 by

We have seen reports of bears in spas a few times. We have also had a few of our hot tub cover clients need to reorder their hot tub covers because the local bears have chewed up the covers.

You can protect your hot tub cover from bears. Our solution is to use our spa cover conditioner and protector on the spa cover. As the article below states, the bears smell the vinyl as it grows old and they think it’s an ant hill, so they eat it. Spa cover care products will protect the spa cover vinyl from producing the smell and make the vinyl last longer in the process.

bear-in-pool

NORTH VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) -

Yet another bear sighting in a Lower Mainland neighbourhood. This 400-pound bruin was spotted in the Deep Cove area.

Tony Webb with the North Shore Black Bear Network says they need to fatten up before the winter.

“A big bear like that will need the equivalent of about 30 hamburgers a day, a lot of calories, before going into hibernation,” he explains.

Besides the usual food aromas, bears are attracted to the smell coming from hot tub covers.

“The vinyl starts to break down and releases formic acid that emulates an ant’s nest and will attract a bear,” Webb warns. “One technique to get rid of the smell is to wipe the cover weekly with a strong ammonia solution.”

If you see a bear in the neighbourhood, keep your distance, not because the bear might attack, but because bears might lose their fear of humans if it gets used to seeing people.

A bear had to be tranquilized after found wandering in North Burnaby on Thursday.

 

How to Keep Bears Away from your Spa Cover

 

Our specially formulated Spa Cover Conditioner and Protector helps keep your cover looking new. Now with added UV protection to help extend the life of your cover!

Maintain the beauty and service life your your new Hot Tub Works spa cover (and spa pillows too) with our Spa Cover Conditioner and Protector. Specially formulated to work with marine grade vinyl in harsh environments. Easy to use. Includes UV blocker. Also helps to restore the luster to your vinyl.

And, it prevents the smell of aged vinyl, so delicious to bears!

 

 

 

Hot Tub Safety Tips

July 20th, 2012 by

Hot-Tub-Safety by Pool Gear Plus

Your Health: Hot tub safety tips

by Terry Hollenbeck, M.D.

Hot tubs, also known as spas, Jacuzzis and soaking tubs, have long been enjoyed by people seeking relaxation, stress reduction and a way to soothe aching muscles.

In my research for this column, I could find no scientific studies relating to the safe use of hot tubs. Most literature I reviewed states that if you have health questions relating to safe use of your hot tub, you should consult your physician.

Well, folks, because of the lack of medical research data, this physician — and most of my colleagues with whom I have spoken — can’t give any scientifically proven guidelines for the safe use of hot tubs. What advice we can give falls along the lines of experience and common sense.

With that being said, here are my guidelines for the safe use of hot tubs:

  • Shower with soap and water before and after use of a hot tub.
  • Do not heat your tub hotter than 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and use an accurate thermometer to determine the temperature. Even if you’re in good health, do not soak longer than 20 minutes at a time.
  • A temperature of 100 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes is safer for those with heart disease or chronic medical problems and during pregnancy. It would be best not to use a hot tub during the first three months of pregnancy.
  • Children should be at least 5 years old and soak no longer than 10 to 15 minutes — and always under adult supervision — in a tub no hotter than 100 degrees.
  • Avoid hot tub use if under the influence of alcohol or drugs such as tranquilizers, antidepressants or sleeping pills.
  • Slowly exit the tub after soaking. Sit on the edge for a few minutes before standing upright. This should prevent the possibility of passing out because of the tub lowering your blood pressure.
  • Keep the tub clean and well maintained.

One way to prevent overheating is to not submerge your entire body in the hot tub water. Keeping your arms and shoulders out of the water is a good way to avoid getting too hot.

If someone with heart disease has been cleared by a doctor as well enough to exercise, they are probably at no risk when using a hot tub according to the above guidelines. Contrary to popular opinion, there is no evidence for increased risk of a heart attack while relaxing in a hot tub.

Hot tub folliculitis is a common pimple-like rash that will afflict some people after the use of a tub with a low chlorine level. It can be avoided by properly maintaining the tub and by showering after tub use. Unless severe, this rash will usually heal itself without the need to seek treatment from a doctor.

Enjoy your hot tub — that’s what it’s for.

Terry Hollenbeck, M.D., is an urgent-care physician at Palo Alto Medical Foundation Santa Cruz in Scotts Valley. Readers can view his previous columns on his website, valleydoctor.wordpress.com, or e-mail him at valleydoctor@sbcglobal.net. Information in this column is not intended to replace advice from your own health care professional. For any medical concern, consult your own doctor.

NOTE- Many safety issues arise when the hot tub is not use, please use a locking hot tub cover to secure hot tub when it’s not in use.

Hot Tub Covers Save Water and Energy

July 9th, 2012 by

go-green

We help people save energy and water with our hot tub covers. In fact our covers were approved by Oregon Energy Trust for a $100 rebate because we can save up to 40% of energy with our energy saving hot tub covers.

That being said, there are many other ways to save around the home.

Learning to conserve water and energy is very important. As humans, we tend to over-consume, leading to unacceptable amounts of waste. Living sustainable starts in your home. Between showering, laundry, running your spa and lighting the rooms of your house, we waste energy every single day. However, there are many ways you can start saving today.

Adapting to taking shorter, “efficient” showers and using less lighting, can be very beneficial. Another effective way to conserve is by updating your old appliances to low-flow, energy efficient, or water conserving equipment. By using less and updating your appliances, you can quickly conserve a lot and lower your bills!

Let’s take a closer look with this Acting Green vs. Buying Green:

acting-green-buying-green
Source: eLocal.com

Energy and Water Efficient Spa & Hot Tub Operation

  • Keep your spa cover in good condition, and well fitted.
  • Reduce temperature during times it’s unused.
  • Use low speed only unless you’re using the spa
  • Keep your spa filter clean. Replace the cartridge annually.