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Archive for the ‘spa covers’ Category

Amazing Inground Hot Tubs

September 3rd, 2015 by

inground-spas-are-coolMy husband and I have been shopping for a new house lately – it’s so much fun, no really it is – looking at all the glitzy OC houses online.

Recently we’ve become enamored with the idea of an inground spa. That would be a first for us, now on our third spa, after getting our feet wet with wood hot tubbing, when that became fashionable, in the eighties.

Our budget is not something that can afford oceanfront property with a stunning spa and soaring pool – but one can dream, can’t she?

I did a little searching for homes with “spa or hot tub” as my main criteria – Oh, and a price range of $5M – $10M

“Honey…? I like this one, come look!” :-)


Image Credit: Tapiture.com



Image Credit: Zillow.com



Image Credit: Zillow.com



Image Credit: Zillow.com


Image Credit: Houzz.com



Image Credit: Houzz.com (this one needs a New Spa Cover!)



Image Credit: Realtor.com



Image Credit: Realtor.com



Image Credit: Houzz.com



Image Credit: Houzz.com

Amazing inground hot tubs! If we don’t find a house in our price range with an inground spa, or pool/spa combo – we may just build our own! I’ll keep you posted!


Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works



Bad Fitting Hot Tub Covers

June 25th, 2015 by

ill-fitting-spa-coverI was visiting a friend at a beautiful resort home in Breckenridge, Colorado last weekend. They had so much snow in these parts of the Rockies (over 5 ft in May), that there is still snow now covering the mountain peaks.

A rental home with a hot tub in Breckenridge is easy to find. This town and many like it across the west are teeming with hot tubs. Rental homes with hot tubs need some extra attention, and if you have a hot tub at a vacation or rental property that you own, read Carolyn’s post on vacation home hot tub maintenance.

The purpose of today’s post is to rant about ill-fitting spa covers – oversized, undersized, wrong shape or size.

What’s Wrong With it?

Who cares, so what – if the cover is a little big for the spa, or doesn’t match the corner radius correctly? No big deal, right? OK, maybe no BIG deal, but from where I sit, there are some concerns about heat loss, cover durability and spa safety.

HOT TUB HEAT LOSS: When the skirt, or flap on the edge of the cover doesn’t sit flush over the outer lip of the spa or spa cabinet, heat seeps out, and air flows in. Both will create more work for your spa heater. A spa blanket can help, but if you see steam escaping from your spa top, imagine it as dollar bills with wings.

SPA COVER DURABILITY: When a spa cover does not fit properly, either too small or too large, or the wrong shape, the foam panels are more susceptible to damage from tree branches, dogs or kids, and from high winds that can toss a spa cover across the yard or even over the fence.

SPA SAFETY: If you can’t hook all of the spa cover safety straps, the spa is less safe than it needs to be. If there is any chance that the cover could be moved or fall in, then an ill-fitting spa cover could be dangerous for children or animals.bad-fitting-spa-cover

This ugly hot tub cover atop the otherwise beautiful Jacuzzi hot tub was costing the property management hundreds of dollars per year in heat loss. You can see how poorly made the spa cover is – wrinkles in the exterior fabric point to poor workmanship. So maybe they saved a few dollars on an ill-fitting spa cover, but in the long run, they are paying a much higher price!

If your spa cover does not fit correctly, there are some things you can do to help it out, if you aren’t ready to replace your spa cover just yet. First, turn the heat down as much as possible when not in use, and secondly, use a floating foam spa blanket to help reduce heat loss and water evaporation.

spa-cover-capSpa Cover Caps can also be used to help reduce heat loss on old, broken and ill-fitting spa covers. To increase the R-value, first place a heavy wool blanket over the hot tub cover, and then cover with the Spa Cap.

And for bad fitting spa covers that can’t be latched safely with cover clips to keep out young children, I recommend using spa cover “Hurricane Straps“, so called because they hold covers tight in high winds; they are also an added layer of protection for securing any hot tub cover safely.

Moral of the Story: Don’t buy a cut-rate, ill-fitting spa cover that seems like a great deal. In the long run, you may spend 2-3 times what you saved on wasted heat and premature cover failure.

To avoid this pitfall, order spa covers by specific spa make and model when possible, this ensures that your cover is made to manufacturer specs. For spa cover measuring or ordering questions, we have spa cover technicians standing by!


- Jack



Hot Tub & Spa Safety Products & Practices

June 8th, 2015 by

toddler-in-a-hottub-from-here-to-maternity-dot-comSafety products for spas and hot tubs? If you’re wondering how to child-proof your hot tub or spa, it’s a question that we get a lot here ~ new parents asking how to keep toddlers and children safe around hot tubs.

Not as common as pool safety products, which have several types of safety covers and dozens of pool alarm systems, but there are several practices and products that you can use to elevate your hot tub safety.

Today’s blog is a list of spa safety products and some hot tub safety tips to make a spa safer for children to be around.



PLEASE-LOCK-THE-SPAEvery hot tub should have a spa cover in good condition, and cover straps with clips in at least 4 locations. If your cover begins to take on water, or puddle in the middle, buy a new spa cover, or replace the foam panel inserts. The small cover clips don’t look like much protection, but they’re almost impossible for small hands to operate. For more protection use our heavy duty spa straps, meant for protection from high winds, but they also function as another layer of protection.


lock_icon_image_150_wht_16460Most spa cabinet doors open fairly easily, and many have a magnetic latch that prevents the system from starting if the door is ajar, but very few people I know lock their spa cabinet door. All you need is a latch and padlock from a hardware store, and a screwdriver to install it. This will protect small people (who are always drawn to small doors) from getting under the spa, into the equipment bay, where electrical hazards (and other hazards) exist.


door-alarms-by-poolguardAnother good option to secure the spa is to use door alarms for any door or window that leads to the hot tub area. Like the pool fencing below, door alarms are a pool product that is easily adapted for increased hot tub safety. They install easily in minutes, and run off a 9V battery, like a smoke detector. Pass thru button allows adults to enter through either direction without setting off the alarm. Gate alarms can also be used, mounted on fence posts for backyard gates. They operate the same way as door alarms, but have attachments for different fence posts.


In most areas, a suitable fence is required to install a hot tub. However, I know that there are many spas and hot tubs that don’t have a fence anywhere nearby. A good fence around the backyard will protect your neighbors and local wildlife from potential catastrophe, but what about children inside the house? In many homes, one door on the back of the house is all that separates a spa or hot tub. safety-mesh-pool-fencingAn easy solution is to install removable pool safety fencing around the spa, to create a secondary barrier to the hot tub. Mesh pool fence panels are 10 ft long, and install into wood or concrete; removes easily when using the spa, or when children are grown.


spa-chemical-lockerWe’ve talked before about safe spa chemical storage, here and also here, and shown you many ways to creatively and safely store spa chemicals. Tips for safe spa chemical storage won’t include storing them in the hideaway steps, or underneath the spa. Just like other household chemicals, hot tub chemicals need to be stored safely out of reach of children. A sturdy, locking chest or box with a latch is most suitable. Simply storing them out of sight, or out of reach (on a high shelf for instance), may not be the best place to keep your spa chemicals.


Some of the most unsafe spa designs is an inground or sunken spa. This is because they are at ground level and are often left uncovered or the cover is not anchored into the ground. For an inground spa or hot tub, you can secure the cover clips into the floor, just use a masonry or tile drill bit and use anchor sockets. indoor-inground-spaI also recommend the thickest and strongest spa covers for inground spas, 6″ tapering to 4″, to protect the spa cover from dancing kids, falling adults and sleeping dogs. It is common to use a flat cover indoors, but these are not very strong or energy efficient.


  • Always put the spa cover back on and latch the clips after use.
  • Keep the spa chemicals and the spa equipment safely locked up.
  • Consider additional layers of protection, like alarms and fencing.

single_eye_movement_150_wht_9341I applaud you for childproofing a hot tub, or making your spa safer, and commend your excellent research that lead you to my little ‘ol blog post! Whether you are protecting kids or grandkids, remember that there is no substitute for supervision! Keep a watchful eye on the children!


Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works





Hot Tub Cover Foam Replacement

May 15th, 2015 by

EPS-hot-tub-cover-foam-coresQ: Can the foam panels inside of your hot tub cover be replaced without buying the entire cover?
A: Yes! You can purchase a single, or both foam cores – vacuum wrapped and heat sealed in our US factory, and shipped to your door.

The foam core panels of your spa cover are the “core” of any spa cover, providing a sturdy, yet lightweight barrier to heat loss, up to R-value = 30, when you buy the thickest 6″ to 4″ taper, in the strongest 2 lb. foam density.

Thickness and density, and the 20 gauge steel channel are what gives hot tub works foam panels their strength, and the vacuum shrunk vapor barrier, with heat sealed seams is what allows us to provide a 5-year warranty on our spa cover foam, even covering water absorption!

Why Buy New Spa Cover Foam Panels?

Although the outside vinyl on a spa top can crack and fade and eventually need to be replaced, it is the foam core panels that are the most important part of your spa cover. Panels can break or become waterlogged (or both), at the hands of these spa cover enemies:

  • Grandchildren, using the hot tub as a stage, or the cover as a fort.
  • Dogs, especially big dogs who enjoy the warmth.
  • Tree Branches falling on the cover.
  • High winds blowing the cover across the backyard.
  • Friends falling or stepping on your spa cover, when a cover lifter is not used.
  • Bears, who like the piquant and nutty flavor of spa cover foam.

How to Buy Replacement Spa Cover Foam Core Panels

If you purchased your spa cover from Hot Tub Works, it’s easy – just call us with some info, and we can pull up the measurements for your previous or current cover. If you are not sure where the hot tub cover came from, no problem, we can make new foam panels with a quick measurement of your current, broken or waterlogged foam panels.Hot-tub-foam-cover-panels

  • Center height and outer height or thickness, of the foam panel halves.
  • Foam density, if known – or the foam density desired. 1.0 lb., 1.5 lb., or 2.0 lb.
  • Panel shape – square, round, hex or octagon, rectangle with radius corners or wedge corners.
  • Perimeter measurements, radius or corner length and diameter of foam panels.

You can also order over the phone, with our helpful spa cover experts guiding your measurements.

Cost of Spa Cover Foam Panels

Probably more than you may think, panel replacements for spa covers can cost 60-70% of the cost of a new spa cover. They require technician time to design with the CAD program and cut with our laser cutting system. Then we have the 20 ga. steel channel installed on the thick side before it goes to be sealed in a 6 mil vapor barrier. We are one of the few spa cover manufacturers that vacuum shrinks a continuous PE sheet, and then heat seals the seams on both ends.

There are too many variables of thickness, density and size to quote any reliable prices here, but if you need a single cover panel, it can run a few hundred, and for a set of both foam panel halves, it can run several hundred. So…. if the entire spa cover costs $400, the foam panels alone will cost about $275 – almost the cost of a new cover.

Buying just one foam panel insert will cost the same in shipping as buying both foam panel halves, so most people buy both foam pieces, according to Alea Cozzi, our Customer Service Manager, who knows such things… She also notes that because our hot tub covers ship Free – buying just the foam panels and then paying for shipping makes the cost of buying just the foam panels come close to the cost of a complete spa cover.

Buying New Hot Tub Foam Pieces

Don’t be discouraged that replacing the foam panels won’t save as much money as you thought – if your spa cover is only a few years old, you can save at $100-$200 over the cost of buying a new spa cover. You do want to be careful to use only closed cell EPS foam (Expanded Polystyrene), and for outdoor covers, it must be beveled, or tapered, so that rain runs off the side. You also have to be careful to buy the correct size, length and height, to fit inside of your spa cover. Call Us, and we’ll make sure you get the correct foam panels, in the density that you desire.

How to Replace Spa Cover Foam Panels

Jerry-showing-us-spa-cover-foam-coreIf you do decide to replace the foam core panels, the process of removing and replacing the foam panels is not hard. Fold the cover on its hinge, and unzip the two zippers their full length. Then simply pull out the foam panel, working it slowly from side to side, to remove it from the tight fitting vinyl “bag”.

When inserting a new foam panel, take care not to rip the vapor barrier as you are pushing it into the cover – the corner may get snagged on the zipper. Also, if the temperature outside is very cold, you may find it easier to install new foam panels inside the house, where the warmth makes the vinyl bag more flexible and easier to work with.

So, if your spa cover is fairly new, but the foam panels broke or became waterlogged, remove the foam panels and measure carefully. Give us a call for a price for replacement spa cover foam, and you can save some bucks!

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works



Heavy Hot Tub Covers

May 11th, 2015 by

spa-hot-tub-careOur hot tub covers are made with the highest quality, 100% virgin EPS closed cell foam, vacuum wrapped and heat sealed inside of a 6 mil protective barrier. But even our top quality 2 lb foam core panels can absorb water.

Why? Why do spa and hot tub covers absorb water? Many people will say that closed cell foam cannot absorb water, and they point to studies where a piece of foam has been sitting in a jar of water for 20 years in some laboratory. And this is correct. Even submerged in water, at room temperature, most quality closed cell foam will not absorb water.

However! In a hot tub environment, there is a large temperature difference between the top of the cover and the bottom of the cover, in some cases it can be more than 50 degree difference. This creates an imbalance, and makes the warm moist air of the spa condensate on the bottom of the cover, and become aggressive in trying to escape.

Add to this the fact that most spas are treated with chlorine or bromine, or ozone – which can break down the vapor barrier, the closed cell foam, or both.

What’s wrong with a heavy spa cover?

For one thing, the R-value of the spa cover drops dramatically as water is a very poor insulator. Hot tub cover heat loss becomes a real concern when it becomes waterlogged. Secondly, the weight of the water can actually bend the steel reinforcement bar (not on our spa covers, made with 20 ga. steel bars).

It also just becomes a real pain in the butt – if you have to call a second person to help lift the spa cover on and off of the tub. Full of water, a spa cover can weigh several hundred pounds, which can cause injury, trying to move such a large heavy object. It can also damage or break your spa cover lifter.

Causes of a Waterlogged Hot Tub Cover

  • Torn foam panel protective barrier
  • Deteriorated foam panel protective barrier

That’s it! The 6 mil plastic sheeting that is used to wrap the foam core panels is the main protection against a waterlogged spa cover. Sure, other factors contribute to the problem, like chemistry or broken foam panels, but the fact is – if the vapor barrier is sealed tightly without any gaps or holes, the foam core panels stay nice and dry. Taking care to prevent punctures or tears and chemical deterioration is the best way to keep your spa cover dry and lightweight.

In addition to vacuum shrinking and heat sealed seams (not something all other spa cover makers do), Hot Tub Works spa covers offer a double-wrapped foam core, standard on our “Works” spa cover, and as an option for other covers. Could be the best $30 you ever spent!

How to Avoid a Heavy Hot Tub Cover

  • Remove the spa top twice weekly for 2 hours, to allow the cover to breathe.
  • Avoid unzipping a spa cover or removing panels; creates voids for moisture to enter.
  • Maintain proper water chemistry, and keep sanitizer at a minimum level.
  • Always remove the cover for several hours after shocking the spa water.
  • Patch any holes or punctures in the vinyl cover or foam barrier immediately.
  • Clean and condition the exterior vinyl on your spa cover once or twice per year.
  • Protect your spa cover from damage by keeping it locked, or use Hurricane straps.

In addition, buying a quality spa cover from a company you can trust, will prevent many problems with waterlogged spa covers. The “Other Guys” don’t vacuum wrap and heat seal the foam panels, and don’t use heavy duty polyester scrim and zipper.

Most importantly, hot tub covers from Hot Tub Works are warranted for 5 years against moisture in the foam core. How can we do that? Truth is, our warranty claim rate is very low, and less than 0.65% of our hot tub covers need warranty assistance.

How to Dry out a waterlogged spa cover

bailing_water_all_of_the_work_300_wht_15637Once your vapor barrier has been compromised, there is not much chance of drying out the foam panel completely, but you can take it off the spa and lean it up against a wall, so that excess water drains out. There is no reason to unzip the cover and pull out the panels, since they are encased in plastic and won’t dry out anyway. Even if you remove the foam panels from their vapor barrier, very little drying of the foam will occur, even after days of drying time.

There is very little you can do once a spa cover has taken on water, except to try to find the rip, tear or puncture and make a repair, but by then it may be too late. The best thing for a waterlogged hot tub lid is to set aside $300-500, and buy a new spa cover. This time you may opt for a spa cover with denser and thicker foam or more importantly, a double-wrapped foam core.


Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara
Hot Tub Works



Hot Tub Cover Lifter Reviews – Part II

April 10th, 2015 by

animated-spa-cover-lifterI wrote Spa Cover Lifter Reviews Part I, over two years ago, so this topic is ripe for an update. Also, in Part I, we only showed reviews of half of the spa cover lifters that we have and, only positive reviews. :-)

In Part II, we look at 5 more hot tub cover lifters, and show more balanced reviews, negative and positive, to give a better overall picture.

These reviews I found by searching our database of hundreds of emails and thousands of phone conversations with customers. Around here, we talk a lot about spa covers and cover lifters!



  1. cover-shelf-reviews ”Great spa cover for the price, and very simple to operate. It’s really all you need actually, no need for power assist, just open the arms and slide the cover off of the tub.”
  2.  ”When I was installing the arms, I couldn’t find a solid piece of wood to anchor into on the side I wanted to use. Ended up tacking on two 2×4′s and staining them to match the cabinet. Works well.”
  3.  ”The design of the Cover Shelf is good, but over time, the screws worked loose and almost ripped out. My handyman resecured it with some lumber, and it seems to be holding for now…”


  1. covermate-easy-reviews-2“This is just a bar and a strap, not much for the price, but it does the job. I could make my own for $20 in parts. Maybe next time.”
  2. “I love the Covermate Easy. It is easy, but not really for one person, unless you a very big person, I suppose. For little ‘ol me, it’s a little cumbersome.”
  3.  ”Cool design, but not especially “easy” to pivot into position. Also bows under the weight of my cover, and seems to put a lot of stress with how the cover hangs on the bar.”


  1.  covermate-2-revierws“Likes: Easy to use by just one person, no stress on cabinet. Dislikes: Cover hanging by a seam, drilling into cabinet.”
  2.  ”We’ve had another type of spa cover similar to this one, but it was harder to lift the cover, and get it balanced just right. Would recommend the Covermate II for any square tub.”
  3.  ”I’m returning this because I don’t want to drill 30 holes (!) into my spa cabinet. I understand that there is a version of the Covermate 2 that slips under the spa? Please exchange.”


  1.  covermate-3-reviews“Without a doubt, the finest spa cover mechanism I’ve ever owned. The piston arms pop the cover right up with very little effort, and I can tell that the materials and construction is top notch.”
  2.  ”Installation was not as easy as I was expecting, but after 1.5 hr I was ready to test. No go – long story short, the pistons were installed upside down! Took another 1.5 hrs to figure that out and fix it. Quality control is needed, especially on imported products. Come on, guys!”
  3.  ”Even my mom could remove the spa top now. One person can do it, even on large covers like mine (8ft). I actually got this one because it’s the only one that will lock in place. My spa sits on a hill, high winds were always knocking the cover down, onto our heads! Ha ha – but this has fixed that problem.”


  1. cover-valet-reviews“This cover lifter does not have a solid bar running across the cover, on the cover seam, and is starting to rip the cover! Why there is not a solid bar used I do not know, but we have removed the Cover Valet from our cover and are back to manual lifting and moving – not impressed!”
  2. “Got this as a Christmas present. Installation instruction were fair, but managed to self-install in under an hour. The shocks make it real easy to open the spa cover, now even my wife can do it. Should have bought a spa cover lift a long time ago!”
  3. “If you can decipher the poorly translated and sparse instructions, you can install this yourself, with a full set of hand tools. The gas shocks don’t do much, the poles are a little flimsy, and it still takes some effort to lift the cover. That said, it is more stable and better made than my old spa top lifter.”

I hope you find these hot tub cover reviews useful – I tried to pick out ones that had some nuggets of usefulness! No spa cover is made that comes with only pluses and no minuses, I think the cover lifter manufacturers walk a fine line of quality vs price.

Years ago, there were some $500 cover lifters – very nice products, but too expensive – no one bought them. Or perhaps it’s a bit of planned product obsolescence in practice? If you make something too good, you only sell it once! Either way, hot tub cover lift mfg’s found a sweet spot in the range of $100-$200. Not as good as they could be, but a good value for the price.

See all 10 Hot Tub Cover Lifters we have to choose from ~


- Jack


Hot Tub Pioneers – Spa Cover Inventors

March 17th, 2015 by

spa-cover-design-5745932The hot tub cover or spa top, is one of the most necessary accessory items for a spa or hot tub. But it wasn’t always so – in the early days, hot tubs were not kept hot all the time, but heated up as needed. Then, the energy crunch of ’73 hit, and inventors starting tinkering…

The early spa cover inventions were modeled after pool covers, but spa covers could offer more than pool covers; with insulation and hinged folding panels. Most early spa covers, in the 70′s were hand-made of plywood, but remember, portable spas as we know them today, hadn’t been invented yet!

Inventors rolled up their sleeves to design new spa covers that would save energy, and be easy to work with. Here’s a short collection, in chronological order, of some interesting patents for spa covers.

Spa cover US 4236259 A – Gary R. Wendt


A rigid piece of insulative foam, fashioned with hinged cut out sections for users to enjoy a dip in the tub, without experiencing the unfortunate effects of heat loss.

Closed cell foam is soft to the touch, and has a moderate durability against spa chemicals. Easy to remove and store.

The underside of the flip over sections includes cup holders! Obviously, this design was way ahead of it’s time for 1980.


Convert Spa to Wading Pool US 5390377 A – Mark W. Blough


Not really a spa cover, but this device has a curious use – lay it over the bench seats in your hot tub to decrease the depth of the tub to a fun baby pool!

This device was sketched in many shapes and sizes for the most common types of spa shells being produced at the time. Holes in the center allow for water to bubble up through the clear sheet, and hand holds near the edge allow for placement and removal.

The sheet is made of a Lexan or durable ABS plastic for years of use with minimal care!


Hot tub cover US 4246663 A – Anthony J. Aragona

anthony-argona-spa-topI love this one! A spherical dome structure, looks so steampunk!

“A generally hemispherical dome designed to cover a hot tub comprised of two nested spherical shells, which pivot on a a vertical pin running through the superimposed apexes of the two shells. A deck surrounding the perimeter of the hot tub provides basal support to the shells as well as a bearing surface for roller wheels attached along the base of the smaller shell.”

The larger shell is fixed to the deck and the smaller shell is rotated about the pin member through a range of superajacent positions relative to the fixed shell.


Thermal Spa Cover US 4270232 A – Ray D. Ballew


A thermally effective cover designed to entrap and magnify atmospheric heat and pass the same into the water and retain it – the first spa solar cover?

Originally designed for pools in 1979 to be the first type of interlocking, floating solar panels, they also found a use for spas by creating a heat trapping dome over a hot tub or spa, of the right size.

Designs show this floating spa cover (buoyant) being manufactured in different shapes and sizes, 3-corner, 4-corner and 6-corner sections can be used to keep your spa clean and retain heat.


Tub cover US 4234973 A – Craig A. Vetter


You may have seen this one before, a roll up spa cover made of wooden slats – popularized by California Cooperage, who had an exclusive on the design, for a short time.

“This cover for a hot tub has wooden or other rigid ribs secured to a flexible, resilient foamed plastic sheet. One rib is secured at an edge of the tub to anchor the cover. The cover can be rolled between an extended position overlying the tub and a rolled retracted position adjacent the tub. A pair of brackets secured to the tub each have a depression in the top surface in which the retracted rolled cover rests.”
If you have a wooden hot tub, this looks pretty smart, but it’s not a very insulative spa cover.  Use it with a floating foam spa blanket for help keep more heat in the tub.


Spa or hot tub cover US 4422192 A – Terry Jacobs

spa-cover-patentThis design is closest to the spa and hot tub covers that we know today, an insulative cover made from two closed cell foam panels, hinged with a center channel, and covered in waterproof material.

“An insulative hot tub or spa cover appearing in two symmetrical halves, each half comprising an inner foam core capped on a peripheral edge by a C-shaped channel and covered on an upper and lower surface by a softer upholstery foam then entirely enveloped by a heat sealed vapor barrier and ultimately with a vinyl outer cover riveted to the channel by a trim strip. The entire spa cover being designed to come in sealed registry and rest upon the rim of a hot tub, spa or the like.”

Pretty inventive stuff for 1982! Terry Jacobs spa or hot tub cover design has been scarcely improved upon in over 30 years. At Hot Tub Works, we have only improved the design with modern materials and a computer controlled manufacturing process to ensure a consistent product.


We salute all of those brave pioneers who invented and reinvented spa and hot tub covers. Spa covers have come a long way – in over 40 years we’ve seen quite a few designs come and go, thanks to tireless efforts from entrepreneurial inventors.

We are proud to be America’s #1 choice for spa and hot tub covers! Take a look at our affordable and well made spa covers from Hot Tub Works!



Gina Galvin


Children in Hot Tubs

March 12th, 2015 by


Children in hot tubs – is it dangerous?

When my children were young, many years ago, I can remember telling my husband; “they’re not just little adults, you know…”.

Especially for children under 5 years old, with bodies still growing, a hot tub could be unhealthy or possibly dangerous.

The first problem with children using hot tubs involves their ability to regulate temperature and the possibility for hyperthermia, or overheating very quickly, in a spa that is heated to over 100°.

The second issue with kids in a hot tub are concerns of bacterial infection, by absorbing pathogens through the skin, ears, eye, mouth and airways.

And third, the most important reason – is that unsupervised access by children under 5 has resulted in hundreds of drowning incidents by children under 5 years old.

Let’s take a look to see what health experts have to say about children in hot tubs.

  • CDC says: “Exclude children less than 5 years of age from using hot tubs.”
  • Red Cross says: “Children under 5 should not use a hot tub.”
  • APSP says: “No young child should be allowed in a hot tub until they can stand on the bottom and have their head remain completely out of the water.”
  • AAP says: Use a rigid, lockable cover on a hot tub, spa, or whirlpool, or fence in all 4 sides as you would for a swimming pool”
  • Mayo Clinic says: “Young children can quickly become overheated in a hot tub or spa.”
  • CPSC says: “Hot tubs pose a drowning risk to children and an overheating risk for young children.”
  • MHP says: “Hot tubs are too hot for young children, may have high bacteria, and the drain in the tub can trap children.”

The Problems with Children in Hot Tubs

HIGH TEMPERATURES: Young children have skinny little bodies with thin skin. They absorb heat much more rapidly than adults, and can become overheated in just minutes in a spa at 104°, which can lead to dizziness, nausea or even unconsciousness. Children under the age of five heat up four times faster than adults, and also struggle to breathe the very hot and humid (steamy) air coming off of the water. Children older than five should limit exposure to hot water, both by reducing spa temperatures to 100° or less, and limiting soaking time to under 10 minutes.

EXPOSURE TO BACTERIA: In a public spa or hot tub, you never know if the water is sanitary, and if the spa is heavily used – its’ probably not. My advice is to never allow children to use a public spa, where they can be exposed to mycobacteria and pseudomonas or the parasite cryptosporidium. Skin infections, ear infections, or even respiratory infections are possible with adults and children, but children are more susceptible to attack. In a private hot tub or spa – assuming that your spa is not overused and is carefully maintained, and everyone showers fully before using the hot tub – the risk of bacteria exposure may be less. However, sickness can still occur if too many people are in the spa, or if the child stays in too long, or goes underwater, allowing exposure through nose, ear, eyes and mouth. Using the air blower in a spa can produce more aerosol bacteria, released as the bubbles reach the surface.

DROWNING / NEAR DROWNING: A spa or hot tub should always be secured by a locking spa cover, which will make it unlikely that a young child can gain access. Children older than five, working as a team, can manage to remove a spa cover – I can tell you from experience! A hot tub in the home or backyard can be every bit as dangerous as a swimming pool, and should be regarded as such. Drowning can occur from a bump on the head, overheating or from becoming entrapped or suctioned to the spa drain outlet. Teach your children to never use a spa or hot tub without constant adult supervision.

If you MUST allow your Children in a Hot Tub

The hard part is – kids LOVE hot tubs, and it’s a magnet for them. They are drawn to it because it’s close to their size, like a mini-pool, and for kids like mine, if you don’t let them do it while you are watching, they’re going to do it while you are not watching. If you really want to allow children older than 5 to use your private / home hot tub, here are some sensible rules to make it safer.

  1. Everyone Shower before using spa
  2. Turn down temperature below 100°children-in-hot-tub
  3. Limit soaking time to under 10 minutes
  4. Keep heads above water at all times
  5. No more than 3-4 kids at a time
  6. Constant adult spa-side supervision
  7. Have warm towels and cool drinks ready


Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works


Spa & Hot Tub Maintenance

February 20th, 2015 by

image from ThermospasWell hello again, my dear readers; I would have thought this topic would go to one of our more technical writers, but my hot tub was voted as the most well-maintained, and they asked to know my secret! :-)

Flattery will get you everywhere I suppose,  so here I am with some basic spa and hot tub maintenance information. What do you need to know to take care of a spa or hot tub? Read on, dear reader.


Care = Prevention

When we talk about spa care and hot tub maintenance, you really are practicing problem prevention.  There are a number of things that are done on a regular basis, regular hot tub maintenance tasks, and then there are those best practices or methods that are used to keep your spa running well, while being energy friendly and safe for pets and children.


Spa & Hot Tub Chemical Maintenance

  • Test spa water for pH, chlorine/bromine, alkalinity and calcium levels 2-3x per week.
  • Adjust pH, alkalinity and calcium as needed. Maintain a constant chlorine/bromine level.
  • Clean the spa cartridge filter when the pressure gauge rises 7-8lbs, or 1-3x per month.
  • Set the 24 hr pump timer to run on low speed for a total of 12-18 hours daily.
  • Drain the spa every 3 months to prevent buildup of dissolved solids.
  • Refill the spa using a pre-filter that screws onto a garden hose.
  • Shower before using the spa, and Shock after using the spa.


Spa & Hot Tub Equipment Maintenance

  • Spa Covers: Use a spa cover lift, air-out the spa cover 2x per week, clean & condition spa cover 3x per year.
  • Spa Filters: After cleaning allow it to dry fully before reinstalling. Use filter cleaner 2x per year, replace filter every 1-2 years.
  • Spa Pumps: Run on high speed only during use or adding chemicals. Don’t allow pumps to run dry, or with an air-lock, or low water level.
  • Spa Heater: Maintain proper water chemistry and keep a clean cartridge filter to protect your heater element.
  • Spa Cabinet: Protect from direct sun, lawn sprinklers or rain splash around edges. Stain and or seal the surfaces as needed.
  • Spa Shell: Acrylic or plastic spas should be polished when emptied, wood hot tubs require cleaning without chemicals.


Saving Money & Energy

  • For daily use, keep the temp at 98°, or 94° if you only use it every 3-4 days.
  • Bump up the temperature to 101° – 104°, and then shower before using spa.
  • Keep your spa cover tightly fitted, and for extra insulation, use a floating foam blanket.
  • For colder areas, add R-30 insulation to poorly insulated spa cabinets.
  • Set the spa timer to operate mostly outside of peak daylight energy use hours.


Spa Safety

  • Covered: Don’t forget to always keep the spa tightly covered, with safety clips attached.
  • Locked: Indoor spas should be in locked rooms; lock doors and fences to outside spas.
  • Secure: Be sure that spa drain covers are safe and secure.
  • Spa Rules: Use safety signs and teach children the spa is only used with adult supervision.



Make a list or set a reminder in your calendar to not forget these important hot tub maintenance tasks. And if you have someone else in your family doing it as a chore, believe me, you better follow up behind them!

I hope I was able to answer all of your questions about taking care of a spa! Leave a comment if you have any other ?’s about hot tub maintenance, or you want more information on any of my tips above!


Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works



12 Inground Spas and Hot Tubs that I Love

January 19th, 2015 by

We spend a lot of time around here talking about portable, above-ground spas and hot tubs, blah-blah-blah. Although there are conveniences related to aboveground spas, there is nothing like stepping down into the warm water of an inground spa.

I have plans for my own inground spa one day, I have the perfect garden setting picked out. Or, I may build it indoors, when I bump-out the master bedroom to put in my dream master bath!

While I’m dreaming of inground spas, and filling up a Pinterest board with design ideas, I thought I would share some of my ideas with you. Not my ideas actually, but here are some pictures of some inground spas that I love, love, love!

1. Inground Spa with sheer waterfall features in a cool master bath design; with a sun glow day lamp, and backlit glass blocks.


2. Inground acrylic hot tub, set into a wood deck, surrounded in wood coping.


3. Ooh la la, an inground acrylic spa with slide away floor, (roll up carpet) revealing a secret spa!


4. Indoor inground spa on a raised platform, allows for easier spa pack equipment access, from outside.


5. Tiled outdoor inground spa with remote filter and heater. Beautiful stone decking and rocks.


6. Outdoor inground fiberglass hot tub, surrounded in stone, displaying a Hot Tub Works spa cover!


7. Inground plaster and tile spa with 28 spa jets. Steps and seats done in bullnose brick, painted and washed.


8. Kidney shaped inground fiberglass spa, with stacked rock waterfall. Equipment hides under wood panel.


9. Multi-person inground spa with cascading waterfall and elaborate marble and stone decking. Palm tree!


10. Inground 10-person spa in concrete and plaster, with automatic pool cover. And a rhinoceros!


11. Inground fiberglass spa or plunge pool, wrapped in stone and tile. Uses a custom spa cover to retain heat.


12. Florida room with a semi-inground acrylic hot tub set into a concrete surround, spa pack behind wall fountain.


How Much do Inground Spas Cost?

It depends on how elaborate your design is, but in most cases, an inground spa will be more than an aboveground spa, which cost in the $5-10,000 range. Inground spas are cheaper when you use a pre-fab drop-in spa shell, of fiberglass or acrylic, and a spa pack. Concrete spas set in the ground require more work to build, from various tradesmen, which can push the cost to $20,000, or more. So then, we can ‘safely’ say that inground spas are about twice as expensive as aboveground spas, especially if you add-on water features and expensive and extensive decking around the spa.



Gina Galvin
Hot Tub Works