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Carolyn Mosby's Posts

Spa Cover Lifter Buyer’s Guide

October 17th, 2013 by

spa-cover-lifts

We’ve recently added more spa cover lifts to our website. With over 10 cover lifters to choose from, it can be downright confusing. Today’s blog post is a buyer’s guide for spa cover lifters, designed to help you sort through the many models and options quickly.

We offer so many spa cover lifts, because there are so many types of spas, and because inventive people keep coming up with more ways to flip over and store a spa cover!

Here’s a rundown and roundup of the considerations one should make when selecting a new spa cover lifter.

 

Spa Shape:spa-cover-lifters-shapes

To start with, round spas or hexagon shaped tubs require a different cover lift than square or traditional hot tubs. Spa cover lifters listed as designed for “straight sided spas” would not fit round tubs, or spas with curved sides.

Spa Size:

Most spa cover lifters will fit a spa cover up to 96″, or a 8 ft. diameter. For covers larger than this, look at the Cover Caddy or the Cover Shelf. Also, many covers don’t work on spas that are smaller than 6 ft. diameter, or 72″. Most spa cover lifter models will handle a 6 to 8 ft. diameter.

Spa Space:spa-cover-lifters-space

How much clearance do you have available on the side that you flip the cover over? The clearance needed varies among cover lifts, but two only require 6 inches of space to flip and store the cover; the CoverMate 3, and the Cover Valet. Also, spa cover lifters need 2-3 inches of side clearance as well, on both sides.

Spa Location:

Is your spa above ground, partially in ground, or flush with surrounding decking? Most cover lifters are made for fully above ground spas and hot tubs; in ground spas can use the UltraLift cover lifter or the Cover Valet and secure the mounting plates to the deck.

Mounting Types:spa-cover-lifters-cabinet-mount

There are several types of cover lift designs. For those that don’t want to drill into the spa cabinet, use the undermount cover lifts like the Cover Rock-It, or the Cover Rx. These spa cover lifts allow you to slide plates under the spa. Other models will require that you drill mounting brackets on one or two sides of your spa cabinet.

 

Here’s a comparison chart of all of our spa cover lifters at Hot Tub Works. Use this to quickly narrow down a few choices, and then take a look at our spa cover lifters page!

I didn’t have room for everything – other comparison factors may be price and warranty. Most of our cover lifts have 1 year warranty, but some have 5 years! Spa cover lifter prices range (as of this writing) from $99 to $225.

spa-cover-lifter-comparison-chart

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

Spa and Hot Tub Features and Options

October 3rd, 2013 by

modern-spas and hot tubs

Spa shopping soon? Whether this is your first spa, or your second or third, you may be surprised at all of the options available now for spas and hot tubs – it’s like buying a new car!

Many different models, with options like ‘jet packages’ or sound or lighting upgrades. And just like cars, groups of features are included with each model step up in the product line.

Here”s a rundown on some of the newest features and options available on modern spas and hot tubs.

Materials: And colors, too. The materials used for the spa, jets and cabinet offer a dizzying array of options. Acrylic is the most popular material, with the ability to swirl colors, and produce a high gloss, scratch resistant surface. Spas can also be made completely of molded thermoplastics, or use natural wood cabinetry, which looks better, but may require some spa cabinet maintenance.

Spa cabinet options is a nice feature, allowing you to choose from many colors, patterns and textures. A spa with easily removable and replaceable panels will allow you to more easily change the look of your spa.

Lighting: Spa lighting is not just a single bulb at  the bottom of the tub anymore. Manufacturers are placing lights in several areas  underwater, and above water, around the rim. Exterior lighting, down lights that help guide you around the spa, may also be offered. Small waterfalls are commonly lighted as well. Just like trim lighting inside newer model luxury cars, spa owners can switch colors and intensity for different lighting zones.hot-springs-accessories_IQ20

Controls: Spa side controls are more user friendly than ever, with some models allowing operation through smartphone apps, and others with floating remote control devices. Control your pumps, heater, blower and lighting from a touch screen. Program run times for filter and heater. Troubleshooting interface, pass code lock.

Massage Jets: My first spa had just 8 jets. Nowadays, it’s not uncommon for spas to have dozens of jets. More important than the number of jets is the location of the jets, and if you can adjust their flow, without having to turn off or reduce flow to some spa jets to increase flow to others.

There are dozens of types of patented spa jets, or arrangements of spa jets. Different whirly, twirly things that mix water and air – every manufacturer claiming their jet design and placement are the best. Foot jets are a popular option. I love my neck jet, which comes in right underneath the pillow on one seat.

spa-full-foam-insideInsulation: Spa shells are insulated with a thick layer of foam attached to the underside of the shell. Beyond shell insulation, all spa makers insulate a bit differently. Some will insulate the floor, or the the sides of the spa cabinet with foam panels. Many will do full insulation, and shoot the entire cabinet full of expanding foam, while others will do some form of partial insulation around the shell and equipment. Insulation is more important to you if you live in colder region of the country.

Sanitation: As another way to distinguish their models from the others, manufacturers may install sanitation systems to help reduce chemical maintenance. Ozonators have been a popular options for many years. Ultraviolet systems, which bathe the water in UV light are being used more. Many spa manufacturers are now also offering Salt systems on their spas. Add about 10 lbs of salt to the spa, and an electrically charged salt cell will produce all the chlorine you need.

Filtration: Most spas and hot tubs use cartridge filtration, and that’s fine. An upgrade to your filtration could be a larger cartridge, or one treated with Microban, for greater resistance to bacteria.boombox

Accessories: Add-ons that can really add on to the price of your tub! Many are hard to resist, such as a built in music system that can connect to a wireless music system, or through your bluetooth device  (I still have an old boom box next to my spa).

Waterfalls are popular options in higher end tubs, either a 6-8″ small sheet of water, or several small laminar jets that make a steady stream of water. Both can also be equipped with LED lighting. And just like with most automobiles these days, there are trim options, to add more bling to your spa. Stainless steel jets, or stylish trim pieces to adorn your spa.

spa-stepsSpa furniture around the tub makes it look much less boxy and allows you to place towels, supplies and plants neatly around the spa. At the very least, a set of spa steps is needed, to help you and your guests to get in and out safely. Gazebos or a pergola structure allow for some privacy and frame a spa nicely.

A spa cover and a lifter is also needed for whatever spa type you buy. It’s way too costly to keep it warm without a spa cover. Jack says that the spa covers used by most manufacturers are junk, and that “…I should tell you to buy our spa covers!” Lol, that’s mean, Jack.

Still confused? Start spa shopping by selecting your size first, and then decide which options are important to you. Jets, for instance, may not be desirable for the person that would prefer calm soaking to agitated water. Then you can more easily compare model to model, brand to brand. Good luck!

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

Family Games to Play in the Hot Tub

September 12th, 2013 by

family-in-spa
Want another reason for owning a spa or hot tub? Family Togetherness. A family takes work, to keep it knit together. It takes the effort to make it happen, to do things together.

A spa or hot tub is a place where there are fewer distractions, and everyone can enjoy the soothing sensation of the hot water, in close proximity to each other. The result? Conversation.

Have you ever noticed how conversations seem to just flow in a hot tub? People get into a relaxed and comfortable manner, and there’s not much else to do – except talk. Even surly teenagers tend to open up under the influence of hydrotherapy.

Spa Night can become a regular event for a household family, and it can also be a way to spend quality time with nearby relatives. A regular reunion can be held at your house, “bring your suits”!

Games to Play in the Hot Tub or Spa

  • Floating Chess / Checkers Game, for some brain exercising games that all kids know.
  • Waterproof Playing Cards can be used for casino style games or games like Go Fish.
  • Name Game. Pick a name, i.e. ‘Mike’, each person names a famous ‘Mike’, until they can’t.
  • Category Game. Pick a category, i.e. ‘Rock Bands’. Each person names a band that begins with the last letter of the previous suggestion.floating-drink-game-tray
  • Question Game. Ask a question, respond with a question. No statements, repetition or rhetoric allowed.
  • Uno. The card game has waterproof cards. Just use our floating Game and Drink tray for the card pile.

Have fun in your spa, and make it a point to soak with family! A spa or hot tub is the perfect way to reconnect and relax with your loved ones!

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

Spas and Hot Tubs for Weight Loss

August 19th, 2013 by

weight-loss in hot tubs?Use your hot tub to lose weight? There’s been a lot of chatter and controversy surrounding the idea. A lot of hot tub blogs point to a study from 1999, published by the New England Journal of Medicine which showed that Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients slept more peacefully, required less insulin injections and lost weight, when they used a hot tub daily.

Was the hot tub a participant in the weight loss? You betcha, but correlation is not causality. Hot water soaking will relax muscles, increase circulation and respiration, and through perspiration, you can lose water weight, unless you are sipping water while in the tub.

Some say that the more restful sleep is the reason that the participants in this hot tub study showed weight loss, while others will discount the weight loss as merely water weight loss. And though I’m not aware of the significance, the reduced need for insulin is also an interesting result.hot-tub-diet

We have to mention the popular book the “Hot Tub Diet“, by Bridget Praytor. The book was written after the author suffered an automobile accident, and she was unable to maintain any exercise regimens, all she could do is climb into her spa for relief. But the real story is that she learned to reevaluate her physical perception and change her diet, while using her hot tub – a lot.

I think that everyone would agree that the secret to weight loss is exercise and good nutrition. Spas and hot tubs can certainly aid in recovery time after you exercise, whether you bike, run, swim or do exercise routines. And in that regard, combined with more restful sleep, allows your exercise to have a greater effect.

However, if you did water exercises in the spa, or hot tub yoga – you will expend calories while you stretch and extend into some yoga poses or pilates moves – you know, modern calisthenics.standing-asanas in the hot tub

So, Can you Lose Weight in a Hot Tub?

Your hot tub can be a factor in helping you to lose weight by improving sleep, exercise recovery, blood flow, breathing and perspiration. But sitting in your spa, and melting away the pounds? No.

However, if you use your spa for even mild stretching, you can easily shed 100 calories during a 20 minute hot tub session.

 

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

5 Signs that You Need a Replacement Spa Cover

August 12th, 2013 by

spa-covers-newSpa and hot tub covers are indispensable, if you want to keep the heat in the tub – but they don’t last forever. Despite recent advances in materials used, creating stronger and lighter covers, there will come a time when you will need a replacement spa cover.

How do you know when a spa cover has given up the ghost? There are obvious signs, and there are not so obvious indicators. Can you get another year, or a few more months out of the current spa cover? Here’s 5 signs of spa cover distress to look for.

 

Saggy Cover

bowed-spa-cover

 

If your spa collects water on the surface, you may need a new spa cover. This indicates that the reinforcement channel is bent or broken. This is a C-channel that runs along both halves of the spa cover, where they meet at the hinge. Lower grade materials like aluminum or thin steel at this point can bend under weight (dogs, kids, snow), or from many openings and closings.

I know of someone (who shall remain nameless! ;-) who built a PVC support thingy that he placed inside the spa, and it brought his spa cover up level again. But eventually, he also had to buy a new spa cover. This time he bought a Hottubworks spa cover, an engineered steel channel that will hold up to most anything.

 

Puddle Cover

you-need-a-new-spa-cover-1

Water is heavy, at 8 lbs per gallon, it adds up quick. Another case of broken reinforcement channel. Probably started as a small crimp in the channel, which began to puddle some water, and then some more water … and now it looks like a new spa cover is in order.

Once a cover begins a gradual puddle, it can be hard to prevent it from getting worse. If you catch it early, you can flip the foam cores over to extend the life of a puddle cover.

Buy a quality spa cover to start, use it gently, and keep heavy dogs, kids and snow loads greater than 8 inches off of the spa cover.

 

Water Logged Spa Cover

waterlogged-spa-cover

This is a spa cover that now weighs about 3x what it did when it was new. They can get so heavy that they become almost impossible to move for petite gals like myself. They can also damage spa cover lifters when they get too heavy.

What has likely happened is that the foam core wrap has become pierced, is taking on water – and, is not draining.

Our spa covers are double wrapped in 6 mil sheeting, with heat sealed edges to keep moisture out.

If you find a puncture in the core wrap, seal it up with clear tape. Removing the foam cores and allowing the spa cover to fully drain and dry can help for a time. If it repeats, it may be time for a new spa cover!

 

Torn & Worn Spa Cover

torn-spa-cover

When the fabric (marine grade vinyl on our spa covers) suffers from too much sun and weather, it becomes brittle and begins to deteriorate. Eventually, holes and tears will develop that will let in moisture.

Using a spa cover protectant like our Spa Cover Conditioner & Protectant will keep your spa cover clean, and it will keep it supple and soft. Similar to using Armor All on your car’s dashboard to prevent cracking, your spa cover will benefit in the same way from a regular conditioning.

Small rips and tears in the material can be sealed up with – I dare say, Duct Tape of all things. It won’t be pretty, but it may get you by for another year, if the foam cores, wrap and channels are in good shape.

 

Smelly Spa Cover

SMELLY-SPA-COVER

Musty, mildewy, old wet dog – whatever your spa cover smells like, if it’s a bad odor, that probably means that you have bacteria forming inside the spa cover. It probably also means that the cover is water logging (see above). Are you removing your spa cover regularly to allow it to breathe?

A complete dismantling of the cover, by carefully removing the foam cores from the outer vinyl covering. Turn the vinyl inside out and spray it down with Lysol. Now your cover smells like Lysol, not sure which is worse, but at least you’ve killed 99% of the bacteria on the fabric.

The high quality foam used in our spa covers is extremely resistant to water absorption and bacteria formation. When you are ready for a new spa cover, make sure it’s not made with cheaper and less dense foam cores.

 

5 reasons that you need a new spa cover – in case you were wondering about your own hot tub cover making it another year. This time of year – late summer into fall, is the busiest time of year for spa cover sales. It’s that instinctual preparedness clock that we all have that tells us to get ready – winter is coming!

 

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

Spas and Hot Tubs for Fibromyalgia Relief

July 25th, 2013 by

image credit to astraldreamer.deviantart.com/The causes of Fibromyalgia are not well understood, but the symptoms are documented in over 5 million Americans, according to the CDC. Stiffness, tingling, numbness, pain – in areas of the body not affected by disease or disorder. It occurs in over 3% of women, and less than 1% in men, and is described as general and persistent pain in various parts of the body.

A study at the University of Maryland found that many of their subjects found some relief in warm water therapy, such as that found in a bubbling hot tub or spa.

And I myself, as I have aged, have found myself victim to aches and pains in my joints, but also sometimes in odd areas, like my heels or mid-thigh. It sometimes starts just as a low numbness, but can tighten itself up into a pinching sharp pain.

Hot water and gentle movements restores blood flow to an area under blood constriction. Blood flow brings oxygen, and by just soaking, breathing and stretching, I can feel the pain slowly give up. A few times a month, my spa sessions are just like that – more therapy than anything else. I always find relief in my tub, and usually for the rest of the night, so I can sleep peacefully, without restless legs, or just feeling achy all over. That’s what it’s like sometimes.

It helps me to imagine that while I am taking deep, slow breaths in the hot tub, that I am directing the breath to the sore areas; that I am actually breathing the air all the way down to the painful area, whether it’s near my nose – in my neck, or down in my feet.

Rheumatologists have different ways of responding to fibromyalgia, and may include treatment in the following

  • Pharmaceuticals for pain management
  • Physical therapy and movement therapy
  • Massage or Hydrotherapy
  • Nutritional and Sleep analysis
  • Acupuncture or Network chiropractic

Some doctors have noticed differences in brain chemical activity during fibromyalgia episodes of pain. The perception of pain in different areas of the body is not felt until the brain responsible for pain acknowledgment in that area is signaled by neurotransmitters. Low serotonin levels in the same area have also been noted.

Many nutritional and herbal therapies are now being tested for efficacy in treating the symptoms of fibromyalgia, but there is no cure as of yet. Until they figure it out, I know one place that I can find relief – in my hot tub! Leave a comment if you also find that hot water helps!

 

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

 

Swim Spa Covers – Big Spa Covers

July 11th, 2013 by

swim-spa-covers

Swim Spas are wonderful inventions. You’ve seen them, I’m sure – they are typically 12-16 ft long with a powerful 3-4 inch jet at one end of the spa. When the jet pump is turned on, one can swim against the adjustable current, in an “Endless Pool” – say goodbye to flip turns.

Michael Phelps has his own line of swim spas, manufactured by Master Spas, so you know they’re good! Swim spas can be above ground or may be set into a deck – indoor or outdoors.

When it comes to covering a swim spa, a 4 panel or 6 panel spa cover is used. These are what we call custom covers, due to their size. Each swim spa cover we make, as are all of our spa covers, is created with computer aided design – CAD, even when we know the make and model of the swim spa. This ensures a precise fit, for maximum heat retention and strength.

A 3-panel swim spa cover, made of 3 individual panels, or of two bi-fold sections and a center single piece – is not a good choice for a swim spa. A 3 panel spa cover must span a larger distance, which places more stress on fewer panels, which have fewer cross braces. In addition, the run-off from rain is far from optimum when only 3 panels are used.

swim-spa-cover-layout

 

This is why we use a 4 panel configuration on our swim spa covers, and for larger swim spas, usually those with an attached hot spa on one end, we use a 6 panel layout, shown here.

I came across another type of swim spa cover during my research for this article. A roll-up style of spa cover for swim spas. Looks easy to remove, but how about strength or safety?

If your swim spa is outdoors, or if you have animals or kids, a strong cover that cannot be easily removed would be highly recommended.

A 4 or 6 panel swim spa cover, with 8 or 10 galvanized steel cross braces is very strong, even under heavy snow loads, sleeping dogs or dancing children.

 

And, it really takes no time at all to remove, and are lightweight enough to be easily managed, even without a spa cover lifter. For a truly simple set-up however, many swim spa owners will use a spa cover lifter on each end of the spa, or some will use a spa side rack to store the covers safely, while the swim spa is in use.

Hot Tub Works is the largest spa cover dealer in the US. We know this, because we keep our ear to the ground, and have the inside scoop from our suppliers and industry contacts. We ship over 1000 spa covers each month – and in some months, we ship double that amount.michael-phelps-in-hot-tub

Enough tooting our own horns. Quite simply, if you are looking for a quality spa cover for your swim spa, one that will last for years, fit properly and provide a high level of safety – give us a call for our swim spa cover prices and options.

Now I’ve got myself wanting a swim spa! I wonder if Michael Phelps will deliver me on himself? Sure would like that! ;-)

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

Spas and Hot Tubs for Back & Joint Relief

June 27th, 2013 by

hot-tub-spa-therapyI suppose we’re stating the obvious here, I mean, everyone knows that back pain can be relieved by a soak in hot water, right? And, it makes sense that the same hot water therapy can relieve the pain and swelling of arthritic joints.

According to The National Institutes of Health, Spa therapy, or hot-water balneology, appears to be indicated for chronic low back pain, stabilized rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia. Clinical trial findings suggest that patients with knee and hand osteoarthritis may benefit.

OK, point proven. Hot tubs and spas are great for what ails ya. The combination of the heat and the body’s buoyancy in the water relax the central nervous system and allow blood to flow. Increased blood flow helps to relieve inflammation and swelling, and brings more white blood cells to your painful areas.

And if you have massage jets in your spa, you get the bonus benefit of hydro-massage to specific areas.

Back Pain

Chronic back pain is an extremely disabling condition, affecting millions of Americans. Persistent pain can be managed with pills, but for many, it’s the hot tub that brings steady relief.

back-painBack pain can be caused by vertebrae misalignment, or from compression on the nerves that pass through the spine. Warm water therapy has been shown to be useful (American Journal of Medicine) for those recovering from back or spine trauma. Range of motion exercises in the hot water can increase one’s flexibility in the affected region.

Although hot water soaks are great for backs, experts generally agree that for first aid treatment to back injuries, one should start with ice or cold compresses. After some stabilization of the area, alternating treatments of hot water soaking and cold compresses can be used. Weeks or months after an injury, hot tub therapy can continue to bring back pain relief and speed healing of the area.

 

Arthritis Pain

As early as 1938, the New England Journal of Medicine stated “No therapy has been shown to be more consistently effective at treating chronic arthritis, as is physical medicine, including hydrotherapy”.

arthritis-painArthritis can be of two types, rheumatoid or osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is when the body’s defenses are weak, affecting joints and bones. Osteo-Arthritis is a more common type of arthritis, affecting joints and bones that had suffered previous injury. Another very painful type of arthritis is Gout, when crystals develop between and around the joints. The swelling and pain can be excruciating.

Fortunately, there is relief in hot water. The temperature of the water helps to increase blood flow, and reduce swelling, while numbing pain receptors. Constricted muscles slowly expand as the skin absorbs the moisture deep into the body. Toxins are drawn off, and one can finally relax.

Hot tubs aren’t a panacea for pain management, but they do provide real relief, and are an accepted treatment for back pain, arthritis, and many other ailments.

Does your spa bring therapeutic relief to you or your family? What benefits do you see? Which conditions is your spa or hot tub treating effectively?

We’d love to see your comments below!

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

 

Foamy & Cloudy Spa Water

June 13th, 2013 by

cloudy-spa-water

The water in a spa may appear cloudy, when the jets are on high. Small whitecaps of larger bubbles on the surface is normal, as shown in the picture on the left. But, if you have larger volumes of foam, especially in an off-color, or the spa water is cloudy or hazy when the jet pumps are off – there is a deficiency (of sanitation or filtration) or a contamination.

No one likes foamy or cloudy spa water – this post will give you the action steps to take to restore water clarity in a spa or hot tub.

Check the Filter

Your spa cartridge filter could be due for a cleaning, so at first sign of hazy spa water, pull out the filter and give it a good cleaning with the garden hose. If you haven’t done so in 6 months or so, use a spa filter cleaner to remove oils and minerals that can clog the pores of your cartridge filter. For best results, allow the cartridge to dry fully before using, or keep a spare on hand for a quick spa filter change. When you reinsert the spa filter, make sure that it is fully seated into the cartridge housing. Water can bypass a spa filter cartridge that is not inserted fully, or sealed up on both ends. Finally, if your cartridge is over a year old, it may be time to buy a new spa filter.

Check the Water Balance

Having the pH and Alkalinity in the correct range is important – it allows your sanitizer (bromine or chlorine) to be most effective at breaking down organics and inorganics in the water. As you test your water balance, also check your level of sanitizer in the water. You need a constant level of sanitizer in the water, to keep it from becoming hazy. After your chemical checks and balances are made, you may decide to shock the spa. In many cases, a clean filter and a good shocking of the spa will clear up cloudy or foamy water issues.

Check the Pump

Your filter pump, is it circulating water, or could it have an air leak or an air lock? An air leak into the pump will reduce the volume of water being filtered and circulated and an air lock will prevent any water flow at all. Air locks are common after draining the spa, and can be released by loosening the union nut on top of the pump, just until water begins to leak out, then tighten again quickly. If the pump is not operating at all – check the circuit breaker and any GFI outlets that may be tripped. Also check that the time clock is set-up properly to run the pump long enough each day for all of the water to be filtered once or twice.

Clean the Pipes

Spas and hot tubs can develop a slimy bio-film inside of the pipes, manifolds and hoses – behind the spa shell. This can build-up to levels where it breaks off from it’s colony and becomes free floating. In cases where draining the spa does not solve a problem with cloudy or foamy spa water, with the other checks above completed, you likely could benefit from using a spa pipe cleaning product like Spa Rinse. Just add it to the spa a few hours before draining – you’ll be amazed at the gunk this stuff removes. You can see it, as it is removed and floats to the surface. Yuck!

Drain the Spa

If you’ve not drained your spa in several months, the cloudy and foaming spa water could be sending you a message. Solids build-up fast in a spa, especially for one that sees frequent use. Depending on how much your spa is used, and by how many people will regulate how often it needs to be drained. For many hotel/motel spas, a weekly draining may be appropriate, and for home  hot tubs, every 3 months is usually adequate. Here’s a handy formula to use to compute how often to drain the hot tub.

when-to-drain-the-spa-formula

(Those are division signs, not plus signs!) For my hot tub, it works out to about every 111 days, or about every 3 months. Replacing the water regularly will help to prevent cloudy and foamy water, bio-film build-up, and reduce the workload for your spa filter and spa chemicals.

HotTub-animated

If it’s been awhile since you drained the spa, you may save some steps and just drain and refill. You may still need to check the pump and filter, water balance and sanitizer level, but sometimes, draining the spa is the best cure for cloudy and foamy spa water.

 

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

Spas and Hot Tubs as Management Tools

June 6th, 2013 by

hot-tub-spa-therapy

Therapy is such a broad term, from aroma therapy to physical therapy. Hot water therapy boils it down a bit more, if you’ll excuse the pun.

Your hot tub or spa can be used to manage all sorts of therapies. I’m not talking about the “stress-reduction therapy” of a relaxing soak, but bonafide physiological benefits to using your hot tub.

Spas and hot tubs can provide specific relief to certain conditions, ailments and discomforts of life. Here’s a break down of 5 ways your spa can become a management tool.

 PAIN MANAGEMENT

For those that live with daily pain, hot water immersion can reduce pressure on joints and nerves by reducing inflammation and lowering blood pressure. For the millions of Americans with Arthritis and other joint problems, hot tubs provide relief by loosening muscles and reducing stiffness. Areas of the body which have suffered stress or trauma also respond well to hot water and massage jets. Spas reduce pain for sore athletes or those injured in accidents. Those with chronic pain from Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue syndrome are also finding hot tubs to reduce their symptoms. Migraines, tendonitis, back and neck pain – all can be helped with regular use of your hot tub.

SLEEP MANAGEMENT

Studies have shown that those who have a hot water soak before bedtime fall asleep faster and sleep more restfully. Using a spa raises the body temperature, while massage jets relax the sore spots. Physical tension (stress) is reduced, as one floats buoyant and weightless in the spa. At first exit of the spa, an energy boost is common, followed by a feeling of relaxed tiredness. I’m usually careful not to use my spa before 9 o’clock or so, or I’m out early!

BLOOD PRESSURE MANAGEMENT

Spas will cause your blood pressure to drop, as your veins and arteries open up and allow the heart to pump with less restriction. Studies on spa users show lower blood pressure levels during and after using a hot tub. However, spas are not recommended for individuals advised to avoid vasodilation, due to high blood pressure. Also, avoid alcohol and cigarette use in the hot tub, which cause vasoconstriction, removing the benefit, and possibly being dangerous.

BLOOD SUGAR MANAGEMENT

People with high blood sugar, did you know that regular use of your hot tub can lower your levels, restoring balance to the blood? It’s true, subjects with Type 2 Diabetes showed reduced levels of blood sugar when they used their spa daily. For this reason, some people unable to exercise are using their spa as a way to control weight gain. The decrease in blood sugar is linked to reduced hunger and faster digestion. There’s even been a book written about it, the Hot Tub Diet.

RECUPERATION & RECOVERY

If you have been in an accident, or had a recent surgery, recovery time can be improved in a spa. Soaking and floating, using the buoyancy to practice mobility exercises and stretching of the affected areas, will increase blood flow and oxygen, and speed healing. A lower water temperature may be used for recuperative therapy, around 88 degrees, or whatever is most comfortable. Professional athletes know the benefit of a hot tub after a game or match, and so do many recreational athletes. I have one friend who comes over to use my spa after every marathon or half-marathon, or 10K that she runs.

So, what therapy is your spa bringing you? Spa owners also report general well being after using a spa – so at the very least, you can enjoy the Mood Therapy benefits of your spa or hot tub!

 

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works