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Archive for September, 2013

Hard Water Issues in Spas and Hot Tubs

September 30th, 2013 by

water-hardness-map-of-US

Are you located in the “Red Zone”? If so, you may have hard water in your home that you use to fill the spa. Having hard water means that you have a lot of calcium in your water, and soft water means that you have less, as it comes out of the tap. Hard water is less sudsy in the shower, and it can leave scale deposits in your sinks, shower and also in hot tubs.

In most cases, the scale is no problem. Go about your business. In some cases, calcium hardness levels can reach levels of 400 ppm or more, which can lead to problems.

They reach a point where it begins to come out of solution, giving your frequently cloudy water and scale deposits on your spa. Scale can deposit in out of the way places, like your heater element or less frequently used jets, or can build up along the water line of your spa or hot tub.

How Hard is Too Hard?

The chart we’ve used here shows the generally accepted maxim that anything over 180 ppm is classified as “Extremely Hard” water. If you have a test kit or test strips that measures for calcium hardness levels in your spa, you can easily check your spa water to see where you lie on the continuum. Most spas and hot tubs will be fine with calcium hardness levels of up to 400 ppm. After that, and you may begin to see signs of scaling and cloudy water conditions.

So What, Who Cares?

so-what-who-caresOK, fair question, and a great SNL skit phrase. How about this? You don’t care if you don’t have a problem. If your hot tub water is some of the hardest, you’ve seen scale deposits before, and know that these salts leave ugly water spots, can be corrosive and when high enough, can interfere with sanitation and filtration.

Treatments for Hard Water

They used to say there was nothing you could do, but nowadays there are several ways to manage hard water levels in a spa, so it doesn’t become a problem.

Pre-Filter1. Filter the Calcium. Maybe you have an expensive home water softening system, and can fill the spa after it’s been treated. If not, you can use our Pre-Filter, to take out minerals, metals, chloramines as well as other particulate matter. Just screw it onto your hose and turn on the hose! Good for 2-3 fills.

2. Combine the Calcium. Using a product called CalTreat, by United Chemical, which bonds to calcium carbonate, until a large enough particle is created to be removed by your filter system. Follow the instructions carefully, and you can see your calcium level drop considerably.calcium-and-scale-control

3. Control the Calcium. Calcium and Scale Control is a product that keeps calcium and other minerals tied up in solution, making it unlikely that they will come out of solution. After the initial dose, just add a maintenance dosage whenever you add water to the spa, to keep minerals in a “sequestered” state. It will also loosen and dissolve some scale deposits.

– Jack

 

 

10 Hot Tubs in the Most Unusual Places

September 26th, 2013 by

hot-tub-in-an-icebergSpas and hot tubs normally sit on the back patio, or built into the deck. Sometimes their placement can be rather bland, but the pleasure is none the less.

Want to add some excitement to your spa sessions? Place your spa in one of these outrageous locations, and you’ll enjoy it even more!

Without further ado, here are 10 wacky spas, in the most unusual places on earth ~

 

Hot Tub Suspended From Bridge

These loco locals in Switzerland suspended a platform over 600 ft in the air, from the Gueuroz bridge. Then they rappelled down ropes for the hot tub party!

hot-tub-suspended-from-bridge

Hot Tub on a Mountain Top

Another group of local locos – this time a group of mountain climbers, decided to relax after their long hike to the top of Mount Blanc. At nearly 16,000 feet, it’s the tallest mountain in Europe.

hot-tub-on-a-mountaintop

Hot Tubs in Computer Games

The Sims is a strategic life simulation video game, where users can create their own virtual reality, including the popular option of adding a hot tub, in nearly any location you wish!

hot-tub-in-the-sims

The top of the line Sims spa has many interesting features: Insta-hot heating coils, Dual pH gigabalance regulation system, redundant ultra-sav mood modulation rectifiers, 29 individual typhoon injector panels, rolling sonic wave instrumentation, no-stick polyfibred surface, stress inhibitor lounge seats, hybrid solar electric integrated feedback technology, nano-force streamlined air filtration apertures.

Hot Tub on an Aircraft Carrier

It’s hard work keeping those planes flying! This rescue boat is filled with water and connected to a hot water heater. Anchors away my boys, anchors away!

hot-tub-on-an-aircraft-carrier

Hot Tub on The River

On the river Thames, to be exact. These Londoners are enjoying a Hot Tub Boat, as they steam around town. You can rent these also in California and the Pacific Northwest, of course.

hot-tub-on-the-thames

Hot Tub in an Igloo

With an open roof, to allow the heat to escape. In this Swiss resort, Iglu-Dorf, you can rent an Igloo for the night, and if you book early, you can get one with a hot tub!

hot-tub-in-an-igloo

Hot Tub in a Tree House

Sure, why not? Tree house resorts are springing up in all sorts of tropical places. This one is on the big island of Hawaii. I really want to visit this hot tub, with a glass of wine, and good friends…

hot-tub-in-a-treehouse

Hot Tub in a Mini Cooper

We’ve all seen hot tubs in limousines (yawn), but would you believe – a hot tub in the back of a Mini Cooper?  It’s modified of course, a la the movie “The Italian Job”, to support the weight of the spa, water and party people!

hot-tub-in-a-mini-cooper

Hot Tub in an Airplane

OK, truth be told, this one doesn’t really fly, it’s a hotel, the Airplane Suite at the Teuge Airport in the Netherlands. I’m told that hot tubs are too heavy (when full of water), so they are rarely installed.

hot-tub-on-an-airplane

Hot Tub in a Cave

What’s cooler than a cave? At 55 degrees year around, it’s the perfect place for a hot tub! This hot tub, located on the Cayman Islands, is beneath a 48,000 sq ft mansion. Now, that’s living in style!

hot-tub-in-a-cave

Well now, there’s 10 hot tubs located in the most bizarre locations. Do you have another hot tub to mention, located in an even more unusual place? Leave a comment below, and I’ll add the best to the list!

XOXO;

Gina Galvin
Hot Tub Works

Restore or Replace your Spa Skirt?

September 23rd, 2013 by

SPA-CABINET-RESTORATIONThe spa skirt, also known as the spa cabinet, or spa surround, is traditionally made of redwood or cedar for long life and resistance to rot and insects. Nowadays, composite materials are also common. These are mixtures of wood pulp and plastics, which resists rot and fading better than real wood.

In either case, there will come a time when your spa cabinet, or spa skirt doesn’t look so hot anymore. It may be faded, stained or rotting near the base. Moisture from overgrown plants or splattering rain or sprinklers can really damage the finish and appearance within a few short years. If left untreated, the spa skirt will begin to fall apart, like an old barn.

If your spa skirt is stained or faded, but the structure is intact, with very little wood rot – you can refinish your spa cabinet, in the same way you would any outdoor wood furniture or decking.

Restoring a Wood Spa Cabinet

  1. Remove the Panels: Use a cordless drill with a proper size Phillips head to remove panel mounting screws. If you have full access all around the spa, you could leave the panels on, but you can sand and finish the panels more easily when they are horizontal.
  2. Clean the Panels: Use a mild soap and a rough brush, or textured sponge. Scrub the entire panel to remove dirt, grime and oils. Rinse clean and use an old towel to scrub them dry.
  3. Sand the Panels: With a belt sander or orbital sander, and block sander. Start with about a 50 grit, and sand the entire surface. Clean with a shop vac, then sand again with a 100 grit. Clean again and finish with a fine grit, around 150. Clean very well to remove all dust from cracks and edges.
  4. Stain the Panels: Using a brush, rag or spray, apply your chosen outdoor stain according to directions. Minwax makes some nice products for staining hot tub cabinets.
  5. Seal the Panels: Unless your stain is a 1-step product with polyurethane, apply a wood sealer or waterproofing over the dry stain, to protect it from moisture and dirt.

Replacing a Spa Cabinet

If you have advanced wood rot that a simple patch won’t repair, or if you want to change the look of your spa cabinet, you could consider replacing your spa skirt. Here’s a few spa cabinet ideas that you can do yourself – DIY.

  1. Wainscoting: Sold in various size panels, or in more expensive packs of pre-cut cedar or pine tongue and groove boards. Just as you would use them on the bottom half of your dining room, you can apply this to the outside of your spa, and add a pressure treated base board, and molding around the top and sides of each panel.
  2. Replacement Spa Cabinet Kits: Available in 3 colors, these kits are a quick solution to a long lasting replacement spa skirt. Made of composite materials and in 3 colors, our Spa Cabinet Kits make spa cabinets with rounded corners easy to renovate, and will fit radius corners of 5″ to 12″, and any spa up to 96″ wide.
  3. Faux Stone or Brick Panels: and hundreds of other patterns of wood or stone. These panels are interlocking, and join with corner stacks that work well for square spa cabinets. Carry the design to surrounding walls, or add faux boulders, Omni Rocks, around the spa

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Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara

 

 

Hot Tub Covers and the R-Value Myth

September 19th, 2013 by
R-values sign at Penn State

The Myth of R-Value and Spa Covers

R-value is a measurement of the resistance to heat transfer for materials like the fiberglass insulation in your house or the insulating foam in our spa covers. In theory, the higher the R-value, the greater the heat retention and, heat retention is the primary function of any spa cover.

Most industries using R-values are regulated by FTC standards. Commercially sold insulation must pass independent tests created by American Standards and Testing Methods (ASTM) in order to be advertised or marked with their R-Value.

 

The Myth: As there is no FTC recognized independent test for spa covers, so any R-value stated by a spa cover dealer is actually an unregulated, unmonitored “interpretation” of the insulative value. It’s open to speculation and abuse, from adding the R-value of the air space between the water and the cover, the space between the vinyl and the cover insulation, or simply blatantly inflating the number. At HTW, we state only the known R-value of the insulation itself plus a small increment for the vinyl and plastic wrapping the closed cell foam core.

The R-value of the actual foam insulation plus covering in our Standard 1.5 lb foam covers is approximately 13.5 and for the denser 2 lb foam, it jumps to 15. This is based on an average spa cover thickness of 3″; our thicker spa covers will retain proportionally greater amounts of heat, as you can see in the image below.

Best Spa Cover Foam

spa-cover-r-value-char-t-2

Foam Density and Foam Thickness.

These two factors affect the R-value of a particular spa cover.

It’s easy to understand why a thicker and denser foam will reduce heat transfer.

But the type of EPS (Extruded Polystyrene) can also make a difference. EPS is made from melting small pellets into a thick fluid, which is in then poured into molds and formed into sheets of varying thickness. The level of gas present in the mix, as well as mixing and drying methods can produce EPS foam of varying strength and density.

Our spa covers use the most expensive spa cover foam (rigid cellular polystyrene thermal insulation) available, which not only holds in more heat, but resists breakage, vapor absorption and chemical damage better than any other material we’ve tested.

ASTM C578 Type IV, 25 psi, 1.55 pcf density

worlds-thickest-spa-coverWhen shopping for and comparing spa covers, be leery of unsubstantiated claims of R-value. Look at Foam Density numbers and Foam Thickness. Most spa cover dealers should be around the same numbers. Our R-Values shown in the chart above are realistic, and in fact may even be higher, but the new EPS we now use has not yet been tested by the ASTM.

Myth Busted!

R-value testing of materials is done at room temperature, and doesn’t take into account moisture and vapor. In the spa environment, we have hot water and lots of moisture. Both of these can facts will dramatically reduce the R-value of a material. Using the best quality EPS will almost prevent any moisture absorption, but a spa at 105 degrees will challenge the R-value of any material tested at 75 degrees.

Therefore, forsooth and verily I tell you ~ don’t let R-value be your only measurement for spa cover quality, instead look for a spa cover with high density and weight, vacuum wrapped in continuous sheets of 6 mil heat welded polyethylene, sealed in heavy gauge marine grade vinyl, with chemical resistant scrim and stitching.

Come to think of it, I just described our spa covers!

– Jack

 

Guide to Hot Tub and Spa Chemicals

September 16th, 2013 by

bogus book, photoshop invention, not for sale, lol

 

Hot tubs and spas would be so much more fun if they didn’t need any guides! One of those important care areas is managing the spa water chemistry.

Spa chemicals are used for water balance (pH, alkalinity and hardness), and then there are the sanitizer chemicals, and oxidizers for shocking the spa. And there’s minerals, and ozone, enzymes and clarifiers. And half a dozen other spa chemicals.

 

It’s enough to make you dizzy. To make it easier, we group our spa chemicals into five groups:

leisure-time

 

Spa Sanitizers

Bromine is the usual method, although you can sanitize with chlorine. Sanitizing a hot tub usually means adding sodium bromide, to establish a bromine bank, and then using enough bromine tablets to reach 2-3 ppm. Shocking the spa with an oxidizer is used to help reactivate the bromide ions. This is known as the 3-part system.

Free is a non-chlorine sanitizer by Leisure time that is completely chlorine or bromine free. If you want to operate a spa without either of these halogens, you can use this biguanide based system to sanitize the spa water.

Minerals can help reduce the necessary bromine level to 1.0 ppm in most cases, and provide extra power to fight and kill bacteria, viruses and pathogens in the spa water. Silver and copper ions will seek out and attack these contaminants, and they work continuously, just replace the cartridge every 4 months. We have 3 major brands, shown below, plus Mineral cartridges for Hot Spring and Sundance Spas. spa-mineral-sticks

 

MPS / Shock

MPS, or MonoPerSulfate, is a non-chlorine type of spa oxidizer, an option to using chlorine granules in the spa to remove contaminants and to boost up the bromide bank on a brominated spa.

Most people I know – will shock the spa after a group of people use the spa, but maybe not if it’s just a quick single person dip. Shocking a spa is not like shocking a pool, in such a small vessel, only tablespoons of spa shock is used to quickly do the job.

We carry many types of spa shock, all are either MPS or chlorine granules. A few of my favorite spa shocks are shown below. spa-shocks

 

Clarifiers

Clarifiers are helpful for small, marginal spa filters. If your water ever gets hazy or cloudy, or if you can see particles floating around in the water, above the spa light, you may want to use a clarifier to coagulate and improve filtration.

Algaecides work by invading the algae cells directly and disrupting their processes. An algaecide can be a good back-up to your spa sanitation, helping to reduce effects of low bromine levels or inconsistent chemical maintenance.

Foam Out is used when your spa becomes foamy, although it can also be an indication that it’s time to drain the spa! If you have already drained it, and still get sudsy, adding a small amount will remove surface spa foam.

Enzymes are a great way to eliminate spa foaming. They also digest oils and suds, making your sanitizer more effective with less oily organics and detergents to deal with.

Metal Out is a chemical used to lock up minerals in the spa water, to keep them from staining or attacking shiny spa surfaces. Hard water areas, or spas filled from an untreated well should use a metal sequestering agent.

 

Balancers

Balancers will help you control the water balance of your spa. Test your spa water at least weekly and make any needed adjustments to keep your spa water in balance. This is important for important for sanitizer effectiveness, protecting your spa components and for bather comfort.

spa-balance-chemicals-htw

 

Cleaners

The cleaners category has everything you need to clean your spa, top to bottom. Cleaners for spa covers, cleaners for the inside of your spa shell, spa pipe cleaners, spa filter cleaners.

Don’t use household cleaners on your spa, you don’t want any residue from kitchen, bathroom or automotive cleansers to mix with your spa water. Use only products designed for use with spas.spa-cleaners

 

And that’s all there is to it! 5 categories of spa chemicals. You’ll need to use at least some of these spa chemicals from each category at certain points during your spa maintenance.

I hope that this guide to spa chemicals was useful, and has made the plethora of spa and hot tub chemicals more manageable to think about and work with.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’Daniel Lara

 

Family Games to Play in the Hot Tub

September 12th, 2013 by

family-in-spa
Want another reason for owning a spa or hot tub? Family Togetherness. A family takes work, to keep it knit together. It takes the effort to make it happen, to do things together.

A spa or hot tub is a place where there are fewer distractions, and everyone can enjoy the soothing sensation of the hot water, in close proximity to each other. The result? Conversation.

Have you ever noticed how conversations seem to just flow in a hot tub? People get into a relaxed and comfortable manner, and there’s not much else to do – except talk. Even surly teenagers tend to open up under the influence of hydrotherapy.

Spa Night can become a regular event for a household family, and it can also be a way to spend quality time with nearby relatives. A regular reunion can be held at your house, “bring your suits”!

Games to Play in the Hot Tub or Spa

  • Floating Chess / Checkers Game, for some brain exercising games that all kids know.
  • Waterproof Playing Cards can be used for casino style games or games like Go Fish.
  • Name Game. Pick a name, i.e. ‘Mike’, each person names a famous ‘Mike’, until they can’t.
  • Category Game. Pick a category, i.e. ‘Rock Bands’. Each person names a band that begins with the last letter of the previous suggestion.floating-drink-game-tray
  • Question Game. Ask a question, respond with a question. No statements, repetition or rhetoric allowed.
  • Uno. The card game has waterproof cards. Just use our floating Game and Drink tray for the card pile.

Have fun in your spa, and make it a point to soak with family! A spa or hot tub is the perfect way to reconnect and relax with your loved ones!

Carolyn Mosby
Hot Tub Works

 

Hot Tub Parts: Pump Parts for Spas and Hot Tubs

September 9th, 2013 by

spa-pump-partsContinuing our series of blog posts about the variety and uses for spa and hot tub parts, today we break down the category of spa pumps.

Fortunately, this category of spa parts is not as large as others, so we should be able to dive into more detail about common problems with spa pump parts, and their solutions.

Take a look at the spa pump parts schematic, you can see the parts of a spa pump, one without a strainer basket. Most hot tub pumps have only 15-20 parts, which fit nicely into 6 groups of parts.

Wet Ends

These are the parts of the pump that get wet. In the image above, it’s everything except for the motor, item 24. Contained within a complete wet end assembly is the impeller and shaft seal. In some pumps, a diffuser, or impeller shroud is also part of the hydraulic design, and an impeller wear ring, shown as item 6.

rotating-wet-endThere are two types of wet ends, center discharge and side discharge. Center discharge pumps shoot the water out of the pump at 12:00, and side discharge pumps, as shown in our example above, shoot the water either left or right of center, and can be rotated to different mounting positions.

To order the correct wet end, it’s helpful to know your spa pump make and model. Otherwise, the motor frame type, horsepower. Also whether it’s side or center discharge, and for pipe size, 1.5″, 2.0″, or larger. As a last resort, measure your wet end, and compare it to our pictures.

Volutes

spa-voluteThe volute is also called the impeller housing, and it’s both halves of the wet end assembly. To make it simple to define, we call them the front volute and the rear volute. The front volute has the incoming pipe connection, the rear volute attaches to the motor. Items 2 and 7 in the schematic above.

In cases of a cracked volute, many of our customers prefer to replace only the offending part and not trash the entire wet end.

Motors

In cases of a burned out spa pump motor, many of our customers prefer to replace the motor, instead of replacing the entire spa pump. And that’s not a bad idea – the parts of a wet end do not ‘wear out’, rather they are either broken or melted, but they don’t wear away, with the possible exception of the shaft seal.

spa-motor-blueMotors typically last around 5-7 years, in most situations. To order a new spa pump motor, you need to know several key pieces of information. Horsepower, Frame, Volts, Amps, Speeds. These are all printed, in tiny print, on the motor label. Comparing pictures of our spa pump motors could be risky, give us a call if you are not 100% sure of your particular motor type on your spa pump.

Unions

spa-pump-unionSpa pump unions are the connectors that allow you to disconnect the plumbing from the spa pump. There are split nut unions, with two screws that hold them together, or types with one large nut, that tightens over the threads on the volute halves. Most pumps have two unions, one on the suction intake of the volute, and the other on the discharge.

spa-union-oringUnions have an internal o-ring to help seal them up tightly. These should be lubricated whenever you put them back together. Lost the o-ring? Don’t worry, happens to the best of us – we have lots of spa union o-rings to choose from.

 

Impellers & Diffusers

spa-pump-impellerThe impeller is the turbine that creates the vacuum suction for the movement of the water. A diffuser is another plastic piece that some designers use to increase water volume or pressure. This fits over top of the impeller, held in place by several stainless steel screws around the edge.

Some impellers have a built in wear ring, like this Jacuzzi impeller shown here with the metal band. Other spa pumps will employ a separate part called an impeller wear ring, that fits over the impeller to prevent the impeller from rubbing on the diffuser or front volute. diffuser

The most common problem may be a clogged impeller, which can be cleared with a bent wire, or small screwdriver. Impellers can break, or melt in some situations, which would call for a replacement. Diffusers break much less often, but if you need one, we have ’em!

Seals, Gaskets & O-rings

shaft-sealSpa pumps have a mechanical shaft seal, which sits behind the impeller, and is the seal that prevents leakage along the motor shaft. It doesn’t touch the motor shaft, otherwise it would burn up, but instead it’s pressed into the rear volute, and seals up to the impeller.

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When pumps are leaking along the shaft, it’s usually a failed shaft seal, which may have overheated, or been damaged from chlorine and ozone. Be sure to use an ozone resistant shaft seal if you use ozone as a spa sanitizer. Identify your shaft seal from the pump owner’s manual, and if you need help identifying your shaft seal, you can always give us a call!

Pumps will always have at least one o-ring or gasket, to seal up volute halves. If you have a pump basket on your spa pump, you’ll also have a pump lid o-ring. Some drain plugs can have o-rings on some spa pump models.

 

Happy Hot Tubbin’

Daniel Lara

 

How to Spot a Junk Spa Cover

September 4th, 2013 by

 

junk-it-2

The spa cover business is rife with imposters these days, making low quality, junk spa covers. And it doesn’t matter which side of the border they are made on, Mexico or North America, you can find poorly manufactured spa covers.

Our business has always been to produce the best spa covers, all computer designed and made to exacting specifications, with quality materials and quality control. But there are cheaper ways to make a spa cover.

Here’s some things to watch out for if you’re shopping for a new spa cover.

First, let’s look at the anatomy of a spa cover. For strength, you have the foam core and the reinforcement channel. For weather and water resistance and to protect the core, it’s covered in marine grade vinyl and the foam core is wrapped and sealed in thick plastic.

spa-cover-anatomy

Solid handles are useful in maneuvering the cover, and good locking straps keep it secure in high winds, and safe for kids and animals. A thick, well sewn skirt helps hold in heat and block any drafts into the spa.

Now, let’s look at some of these spa cover parts one by one, to show how the quality of materials can be manipulated. These are the distinct differences between a good spa cover and a junk spa cover.

TAPERED FOAM CORE

A tapered core will allow water to run off, very important for outdoor hot tubs, and also allows for use of a larger reinforcement channel, for greater strength.

The thickness of the foam core will affect it’s heat retention, strength and water resistance. The best spa covers are 6″ thick in the center, tapering to 4″ on the edges, but you can also find 5″ to 3″ or on the lower end, 4″ to 2″ thick spa covers.

But more than thickness, the weight of the foam or foam density, is important. Spa covers can be made with 1.0 lb foam, 1.5 lb. foam or 2.0 lb. foam. The greater the foam density or weight, the greater R-value your spa cover will have.

REINFORCEMENT CHANNEL

Galvanized steel channels will provide the best strength for a hot tub cover. These are available in many thicknesses, but almost all are superior to aluminum channels, which don’t have the strength of steel. I’ve seen some aluminum channels with the rigidity of thick aluminum foil.

As mentioned above, the thicker foam cores allow for using a taller reinforcement channel across the hinge of the spa cover, to add strength and rigidity. With one on each half of your spa cover, they form an I-beam support for your spa cover. Cheap spa covers will use smaller channels, with lower grade steel, or aluminum, to cut costs and maximize profit.

MARINE GRADE VINYL

This is a type of vinyl made for boats that resists moisture and water. It is available in many thicknesses, and with many options for backing the vinyl. Our 30 oz. marine grade vinyl is a heavy weight, and it’s treated with UV and antifungal inhibitors. Light weight 20 oz vinyl are common on a cheap spa cover, some used without any woven backing.

A thicker marine grade vinyl, treated against fading and mildew, and with a heavy gauge woven backing makes a longer lasting cover that can take years of heavy sun and snow, and even a little dragging around.

FOAM CORE WRAP

This is another profit center for cheap hot tub cover production. We wrap our foam cores with heavy duty 6 mil polyethylene sheeting, in a continuous sheet. Then we fold over and heat seal the edges, before vacuum sealing to remove air. Cheaper spa covers have thinner plastic that won’t stand up to spa chemicals, and use either tape or staple their seams, with no heat sealed edges and vacuum sealing.

As an option, we offer a double-wrapped foam core, with two sheets of 6 mil wrap, and a continuous heat seal that runs across the entire bottom of the spa cover, to stop mildew from forming and prevent heat loss through the fold.

FourPanelCover

Take a look at our advantages, and our low prices – and you’ll see how we manage to sell 100,000 spa covers every year. We have 6 grades of spa covers, from our Economy Spa Cover to The Works – to fit all budgets. But even our lowest price spa covers have quality materials, computer design and precise construction – unlike some junk spa covers out there!

– Jack