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Archive for October, 2012

Hot Tub Dealer Publishes Guide to Educate

October 19th, 2012 by

Beaverton Hot Tub Dealer Publishes Guide to Educate The Public on the Merits of Physical Therapy and Hydrotherapy to Help People Improve Their Physical Health and Well-Being.

Beaverton, OR (PRWEB) October 19, 2012

tidal-fit

This October, health care practitioners and care givers are excited to celebrate National Physical Therapy Month. In appreciation of all the hard work and dedicated help therapists contribute, now is the perfect time to highlight the important role physical therapy plays in improving the lives of those suffering from chronic musculoskeletal or neuropathic pain. Oregon Hot Tub, a HotSpring Spas dealer selling new and used hot tubs with stores in Portland and surrounding areas like Beaverton and Bend, OR has decided to do participate in this very worthy event.

“Raising awareness and informing others of the benefits of physical therapy is an important goal and one that can improve the lives of patients and caregivers for years to come,” said Sue Rogers, president of Oregon Hot Tub. “From pain management to increased mobility, therapy eases suffering, strengthens muscles and makes it easier to move, here are three things that people may want to,” continued Rogers.

How Physical Therapy Helps – Muscle and joint pain from osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia or other chronic conditions can be debilitating and physical therapy can help. Treatment is different for everyone, customized to suit the needs of each person. A consistent program with a skilled therapist can make movement easier and less painful by improving strength, endurance, stability and flexibility. Typically, physical therapy combines a variety of techniques including massage, muscle manipulation, cold laser therapy and more. As an effective, all natural and safe strategy for pain management, physical therapy improves mobility and promotes a healthy lifestyle.

Avoiding Prescription Medications and Surgery – Physical therapy typically focuses on not only pain management, but also, injury prevention, healing and restoring the ability to move. For those suffering with chronic pain, the right treatment can reduce the possibility of having to rely on prescription drugs or surgery for relief. In fact, with improved mobility, restored movement and increased muscular strength, physical therapy may even prevent long term disability. Mobility is the key to aging well and combined with a consistent physical therapy program, taking steps to stay physically active and healthy can eliminate the need for prescription drugs or surgery.

Hot Tub Hydrotherapy – Using a hot tub is an easy way to enhance a physical therapy program. Hot tub hydrotherapy- heat, massage and buoyancy- has been used for centuries to alleviate pain and discomfort, relax muscles and promote health and well-being. For chronic pain relief, a hot tub is ideal, providing the right combination of relaxation and massage to increase flexibility, increase range of motion and soothe sore, stiff muscles and joints. The perfect solution for emergency situations when physical therapy is unavailable, a hot tub provides instant relief.

“To encourage local residents to check out the benefits of soaking in a hot tub to help improve their overall health and well-being, Oregon Hot Tub is providing free test soaks at all their showrooms. We do recommend however that people wanting to schedule their free 30-minute soak call us ahead of time to reserve their spot,” commented Dave Doornink, Oregon Hot Tub’s Marketing Director.

To find the nearest Oregon Hot Tub location, visit the company website for more information.

Bruce Springsteen, Me, And a Hot Tub

October 19th, 2012 by

bruuuuuce

It was a hot summer day on July 26, 1984 when I drove down Highway 401 to see a Bruce Springsteen concert at the CNE in Toronto. I had been hooked on The Boss ever since seeing him deliver a marathon show in January 1981 at the Ottawa Civic Centre.

In 1984, Springsteen’s album Born in the U.S.A. was mammoth, delivering hit after hit — Dancing in the Dark, Glory Days, No Surrender, Darlington County, and the title track, Born in the U.S.A.

Certain albums can freeze time. And no matter how many years go by, the minute you hear that album, you are transported back to that period of your life. In the summer of 1984, Songs from Born in the U.S.A. blasted from car radios at red lights. You could hear the Boss everywhere, at a party, at the beach, the unmistakable voice singing I’m on Fire, volume reaching across Vincent Massey Park from a boom box that required 8 “D” cell batteries.

In those days, I wrote radio commercials for CFRA/CFMO (now BOB FM) and I was lucky enough to have my own office. An office that had a tiny cassette player with surprisingly loud volume ­— which I put to maximum use for hours on end, playing nothing but Bruce Springsteen music. It’s a wonder that none of my co-workers punched a hole through the wall.

Since my first Bruce concert, I was determined to own every album he ever made, and I knew all the words to all the songs.

I spent most of the summer of ’84 hanging out with two guys: Jeff Cohen (now the owner of the legendary Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto), and Barry Kaplan (now an Ottawa real estate agent). We had one thing in common: the ability to talk about Bruce Springsteen for hours and hours. Jeff even started dressing like “Born in the U.S.A.” Bruce Springsteen, right down to the bandana tied around his head. I tried that look too, but I could never get the bandana tight enough and it would slide down and cover my eyes.

Not only did Jeff have the look, he had all the connections. And it was through Jeff that I learned a couple of things on July 26th, 1984. Number one: Bruce Springsteen enjoys a hearty swim at his hotel on the day of a performance. And number two: In Toronto, that hotel was the Harbour Castle.

It was early afternoon when I arrived in Toronto, almost six hours before I was meeting a friend at the CNE to see Bruce Springsteen. I had left Ottawa ridiculously early because I had visions of Highway 401 construction containing me and my Acadian for an entire day and missing the show.

I thought about killing time by going straight to the CNE, eating some pogos and standing in line for the Twister ride, but then I had a better idea: I decided to try to get Bruce Springsteen’s autograph.

The concierge at the Harbour Castle Hotel didn’t flinch when I marched right up and asked, “Hi, where’s your swimming pool?”

I grabbed an elevator, and up I went. I arrived at the indoor pool area, where three kids were having a great time splashing about. Besides the kids and a hotel towel guy, there was no one else, which neither surprised nor disappointed me, as I had little faith that my hotel side trip would actually lead to anything interesting. I started to walk away from the pool area when a sound made me turn around. In hindsight, my about-face was likely due to a rather loud gasp from the towel guy. Which was quickly followed by a gasp of my own.

Bruce Springsteen had just slipped through a back door and entered the pool area. He wore a navy T-shirt, camouflage pants, and a baseball cap, all of which were being peeled off and tossed onto a patio chair. Now clad only in his regular-guy swim trunks, the Boss dove into the swimming pool and swam right by me. I froze. I knew that getting Bruce’s autograph would be tough, considering the fact that he was now wet.

The kids had climbed out of the pool and disappeared. Even the towel guy was nowhere in sight. That left just two people in the pool area: Bruce Springsteen. And me. I did my best to blend in, sitting casually in a patio chair next to the hot tub, stealing only the occasional glance at the Boss, who, as it turned out, was a Spitz-like super swimmer. Ten laps of the pool. Twelve. Fifteen. I kept my head down and waited for that amazing moment, when Bruce Springsteen would be dry enough to sign an autograph. Bruce finally climbed out of the pool, toweled himself off, and just as I summoned the courage to ask for his signature, walked straight past me and jumped into the hot tub. Yet again, the Boss was wet.

“It’s really nice in here,” I heard the words but didn’t think they were being directed at me. “Yes, I’m talking to you.” A gruff but friendly voice from the hot tub. “Why don’t you come on in?”

The fact that I was wearing street clothes was a minor detail. I wanted more than anything to be super cool, to say the right thing, even be a bit aloof. “I guess I could come in for a minute or two.” So, in the hot tub I went, shorts, T-shirt, sandals and all. Bruce was kind enough to ignore the fact that both of my sandals quickly floated to the surface of the hot tub and one of them was sucked onto a filter.

I couldn’t bring myself to admit why I was in the pool area in the first place: for the slight possibility that he would be there. I was nervous but I couldn’t look nervous because that would give away the fact that I knew who he was, which I did, but I didn’t want him to know that I knew who he was, and that made me even more nervous. I abandoned any hope for an autograph, because that would give everything away. Bruce Springsteen was my rock and roll hero, he was in amazing shape, he was sitting across from me in a hot tub.

Then a funny thing happened. We had a lovely conversation. We talked about things that anyone would talk about … weather, movies, the Toronto Blue Jays. Why it’s a good idea to swim every day. Which carnival ride is the scariest. Bruce was engaging, he was funny, he made me laugh. The time flew by and about an hour later Bruce finally said “I gotta go … it’s sound check time.” I responded with, “I know. I have tickets to your show tonight.” He looked a bit surprised. But nothing prepared me for what he said next. “Would you like to join me for sound check?”

I often wonder how many people in my shoes (or, waterlogged sandals) would have jumped at the chance to join Bruce Springsteen for a pre-show sound check. Probably all of them. But, in that Toronto hotel hot tub, I turned down the invitation from the Boss. I felt it was more important that I earned his respect. I didn’t want him to think I was a “groupie.” Do I regret my decision? Sometimes. But at least I had my pride. As much pride as someone can have while trying to pull her sandal out of a hot tub filter.

Moments before Bruce Springsteen disappeared through the back door, I took advantage of the fact that he was finally dry, and asked for an autograph.

Friday night at Scotiabank Place was my 31st Springsteen show. But I will never forget one show in particular, where it was impossible to wipe the smile off my face, after a sweet afternoon with the Boss. Just don’t call me a groupie.

Sandy Sharkey is a radio personality with 93.9 BOB

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

Man Arrested Hiding Under Spa Cover

October 3rd, 2012 by

Dont Hide In A Hot Tub.

With the hot tub cover on, there is only a small air space above the water, which can quickly fill with gasses. Plus, it’s very dark and disorienting, like an isolation chamber.

From the Associated Press:

In ALMENA TOWNSHIP, Michigan,  police captured a runaway suspect trying to hide in a backyard hot tub in southwestern Michigan following a more than 100 mph chase.

Large hot tub cover where man was caught hiding - a customer of Hot Tub Works!

Large hot tub cover where man was caught hiding – a customer of Hot Tub Works!

The Van Buren County sheriff’s department says one of its deputies stopped a pickup truck early Wednesday for expired tags, but the driver took off. The department says the driver lost control and the pickup overturned in Almena Township, west of Kalamazoo. The driver fled on foot.

The department says a Kalamazoo police dog tracked the man and he was found hiding in a hot tub with a cover over it. The 28-year-old man was arrested on charges including fleeing police, resisting arrest, driving with a suspended license and operating a vehicle under the influence of drugs.

Don’t hide under a spa cover! The police already know that trick. Plus, it can be very dangerous in a spa filled with water.

Hot Tub or Hot Tug?

October 2nd, 2012 by

I came across a CNET article about these fun hot tubs made in the Netherlands. You gotta love these folks that are making hot tubs go where they have never gone before.

hot-tugs spa boats

What is a HotTug? A wood-fired hot tub in which you can sail and a tugboat in which you can enjoy warm baths. With or without water the HotTug is a wide and stable boat for up to six people.

In the HotTug you can always enjoy yourself … whatever the weather is. Relax steaming through the canal, harbor or a lake? You’re able to with the HotTug!

This floating, boating hot tub is constructed from wood, coated with fiberglass. The HotTug has a stainless steel stove with a single wall pipe. The HotTug is available in two versions: 1 with integrated electric motor of 2.4 KW 2 with outboard.

How is the water in the HotTug heated?
A wood stove heats the water.

How long does it fill up with water and how long does it take to heat the water?
The filling rate depends on the thickness of the hose and the pressure. The HotTug can contain 2000 liters. The heater heats the water about eight degrees per hour. On average, it takes 3 hours before the water is 38 degrees Celsius. (or 100° in Fahrenheit).

How do you empty the HotTug?
The easiest way is with a submersible pump. With a small pump the HotTug is emptied in twenty minutes.

How hot is the water?
As warm as you want, but average people find a comfortable temperature of 38 degrees Celsius and that is no problem for the HotTug heater.

How many people are able to sit in the HotTug?
Six to eight people can sit in the HotTug.

How does the HotTug sail?
The HotTug is available in two versions:
1 with integrated electric motor of 2.4 KW
2 with outboard engine (electric or petrol)

How long do the batteries last?
The batteries will last at least 600 cycles. If they are not fully discharged, they last longer. On average you need to replace the batteries every seven years.

How much maintenance does the HotTug need?
Depending on the surrounding water (salt / freshwater / brackish), it is wise to apply a layer of antifouling every year or every two years. You need to empty the heater every season.

Where is the HotTug for sale?
At this moment the HotTug exclusively at supergoed.nl

Is the HotTug available in other colors?
By default, the HotTug is black, but at extra cost, any RAL and NCS colors are possible.

Where can I see the HotTug?
In cooperation with the Storm Water Sports, the HotTug is introduced at ‘in water boat show’ / Hiswa 2012. In addition you can see the HotTug at supergoed by appointment.

Does It Need A Hot Tub Cover?

Yes, but they don’t make them, but HotTubWorks.com does, so you are in luck!